Vous-êtes ici: AccueilInfosInfos du MondeThe Guardian (United Kingdom)
PreviousHeadlines United KingdomNext


Greater Manchester to get tier 3 Covid restrictions imposed after talks fail
PM set to impose England’s strictest restrictions after last-ditch bid to strike deal failsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBoris Johnson looks set to impose the strictest coronavirus restrictions in England on nearly 3 million people in Greater Manchester after a last-ditch attempt to strike a deal ended without agreement.The communities secretary, Robert Jenrick, announced that the negotiations had ended after several hours of fraught negotiations came down to a dispute over about £5m – or £1.78 for each Greater Manchester resident – in funding, the Guardian understands. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:58:13 GMT)

'Scarred for life': Sage experts warn of impact of Covid policies on the young
Government accused of failing to protect generation Z from harm caused by pandemic responseGeneration Z and the Covid pandemic: ‘I have pressed pause on my life’Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageChildren and young people are at risk of becoming a “lost generation” because of the UK government’s pandemic policies, members of Sage have warned.Those aged seven to 24, sometimes called generation Z, have largely avoided the direct health impact of the coronavirus. But, say the government’s scientific advisers, they risk being “catastrophically” hit by the “collateral damage” wrought by the crisis. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:00:03 GMT)

Peter Madsen: submarine murderer recaptured after Denmark jail escape
Madsen, who was convicted of murdering Kim Wall in 2017, was arrested shortly after escaping from jail in CopenhagenA Danish man convicted of torturing and murdering a Swedish journalist on his homemade submarine escaped the suburban Copenhagen jail where he is serving a life sentence but was found nearby on Tuesday.The Ekstra Bladet tabloid posted a video of Peter Madsen sitting in the grass with his hands behind his back and police at a distance. According to the daily, Madsen “had a belt-like object around the abdomen”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:28:58 GMT)

Joe Biden criticises Donald Trump for renewed Fauci attack over Covid – US politics live
Americans ‘tired of your lies about this virus’, Biden said of TrumpTrump had said ‘people are tired of hearing of Fauci and all these idiots’Presidential debate commission adopts rules to mute microphonesPodcast: Biden’s and Trump’s possible paths to powerSign up for Fight to Vote – our weekly US election newsletter 2.55pm BST CNN is releasing poll of polls averages of 10 states that Trump won in 2016, and currently, the president is only ahead in one of the 10 states, Texas.CNN reports: CNN Poll of Polls averages across 10 key battleground states suggest tight races heading into the final two weeks of the campaign in seven states and former Vice President Joe Biden ahead in the averages of the other three, all of which President Donald Trump won in 2016.In Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, the averages suggest Biden holds the support of a majority of voters and a sizable advantage over Trump. 2.31pm BST This is Joan Greve in Washington, taking over for Martin Belam.We are just two weeks away from the presidential election -- and two days away from the final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:55:27 GMT)

Police to close Paris mosque in clampdown on extremism
Mosque allegedly posted Facebook video violently criticising teacher days before he was beheadedFrench authorities have said they will close a well-known mosque in a northern Paris suburb as part of their clampdown on Islamist groups and suspected extremists after a history teacher was beheaded last week outside his school.As a police investigation continued into networks suspected of promoting extreme religious beliefs, spreading hate and encouraging violence, the interior minister, Gérald Darmanin, said the mosque in Pantin would be closed on Wednesday for six months. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:41:10 GMT)

Scots should get new independence vote if SNP wins, says Tory-linked consultancy
Memo from Hanbury Strategy calls for ‘velvet no’ campaign to convince voters to stay in the unionA leaked memo given to senior Conservatives suggests the UK government should agree to a fresh independence referendum if the Scottish National party wins an outright majority next May.The document written by Hanbury Strategy, a consultancy with very close links to the Tories, argues the UK government could offer significant new powers to the Scottish parliament and put both options to the vote. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:57:35 GMT)

Teenager's death after being given antipsychotic was 'potentially avoidable'
Oliver McGowan died in Bristol after being given olanzapine despite previously reacting badly to the drugThe death of a teenager who was given antipsychotic medication though he and his family warned that the drug might cause him serious harm could have been avoided, an independent review has concluded.Oliver McGowan, a talented athlete who had mild autism and epilepsy, died at Southmead hospital in Bristol aged 18 after being given a drug for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder though he did not have those conditions or any mental illness. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:48:25 GMT)

Bank of England policymaker backs negative interest rates
Gertjan Vlieghe says the surge in Covid cases means the Bank will need a range of measures Negative interest rates in the UK edged closer on Monday after a Bank of England policymaker warned the central bank would need extra firepower to boost the economy following the surge in Covid-19 cases.In a gloomy assessment of the next few months, Gertjan Vlieghe, who sits on the monetary policy committee, the bank’s interest rate setting body, said the second wave of Covid-19 was holding back consumer spending and suppressing business investment, which would push unemployment higher. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:50:12 GMT)

Chocolate industry slammed for failure to crack down on child labour
Children as young as five still exposed to hazardous work in countries including Ghana and Ivory Coast, report revealsNearly 20 years after the world’s major chocolate manufacturers pledged to abolish employment abuses, hazardous child labour remains rife in their supply chains, a new study finds. Research from the University of Chicago finds that more than two-fifths (43%) of all children aged between five and 17 in cocoa-growing regions of Ghana and Ivory Coast – the world’s largest cocoa producers – are engaged in hazardous work. In total, an estimated 1.5 million children work in cocoa production around the world, half of whom are found in these two west African nations alone. Hazardous work includes the use of sharp tools, working at night and exposure to agrochemical products, among other harmful activities. The report, commissioned by the US Department of Labor, notes that the overall proportion of children working has gone up by 14 percentage points in the past decade. The increase is accompanied by a 62% rise in production over the same period.The findings raise difficult questions for industry in particular. Back in 2001, big brands such as Nestlé, Mars, Mondelēz and Hershey signed a cross-sector accord aimed at eliminating egregious child labour. Despite missing deadlines to deliver on their pledge in 2005, 2008 and 2010, they continue to insist that ending the illegal practice remains their top concern. In response to the scathing report, US chocolate giant Mars reiterated that child labour has no place in cocoa production and said it had committed $1bn to help “fix a broken supply chain”. Campaign groups dismiss such comments as a duplicitous smokescreen. Indeed, a lawsuit stating that international chocolate manufacturers knowingly profit from abuses against children is currently being heard in the US supreme court. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:42:55 GMT)

Amsterdam to use flowers to stop cyclists chaining bikes to bridges
Authorities say canal views blighted by bikes and pedestrians pushed off pavementsAmsterdam prides itself on being one of the world’s most cyclist-friendly cities. But even the Dutch capital has its limits.The municipality has complained that the views of some of the most beautiful canals are being blighted while pedestrians are being forced into the street by the accumulation of bikes being tied to bridge railings. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:34:28 GMT)

Generation Z and the Covid pandemic: 'I have pressed pause on my life'
As part of a new series, young people across the UK reflect on their experiences of coronavirus and the futureCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAryan Nair lives with his parents, Rakesh and Swetha, and younger brother in south London Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:00:03 GMT)

Coronavirus live news: Italy brings in curfew for two regions; Iran and Russia report record new cases
Italy imposes curfew on Campania and Lombardy; Russia records 16,319 new cases; Iran sees highest ever daily tally for new infectionsLombardy curfew aims to curb Covid hospital admissions riseUK to spend £30m on trials infecting young people to hasten vaccineOver 100,000 Californians ‘bought a gun in response to Covid-19 crisis’UK coronavirus updates – liveUS coronavirus updates – live 2.45pm BST Iran’s health minister appealed on Tuesday for more public and government support to enforce restrictions aimed at stemming a third wave of coronavirus infections as new cases set a daily record of 5,039, Reuters reports.“Everyone should know that I, as health minister, cannot bring this epidemic situation under control alone, and a lot more [help] is required,” Saeed Namaki said in remarks quoted by the semi-official news agency ISNA. 2.24pm BST More than 2.5million person-years of life have been lost to coronavirus in the US alone, according to a new analysis that reveals the grim toll the pandemic has so far inflicted on the country.Stephen Elledge, a professor of genetics and medicine at Harvard University used national life expectancy figures and records of Covid-related deaths from the US Centres for Disease Control and Protection (CDC) to work out the amount of life lost in the US outbreak until the first week of October. One must also consider the indirect costs of these lost person-years in the form of emotional and economic tolls these absences impose on the families, friends and co-workers of those lost. Who among us would not cherish another 5 years together with a father, mother, son, daughter or close friend? The full impact of Covid-19 will emerge over time and it is certain to be enormous. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:45:40 GMT)

UK to spend £30m on trials infecting young people to hasten Covid vaccine
London-based hVivo to take part in world’s first coronavirus ‘challenge trials’The volunteers lining up to take part in challenge trialsMore than £30m of UK government money is to fund the world’s first Covid-19 “challenge trials”, in which healthy young volunteers are intentionally infected with the virus to hasten the development of a vaccine. The trials have the potential to yield results more quickly than conventional vaccine field trials in which researchers must wait for participants to get infected in the real world. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:09:25 GMT)

Durex sales surge after end of UK national Covid lockdown
Reckitt Benckiser says condom sales rose more than 10% after restrictions were relaxedCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe end of the national lockdown spurred a summer of love that revived condom sales at market leader Durex.Global sales at the condom brand jumped more than 10% over the summer months when a respite from coronavirus restrictions enabled people to rekindle their sex lives. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:39:43 GMT)

How the Greater Manchester Covid lockdown standoff unfolded
There has been no resolution despite talks starting 11 days ago as Westminster’s noon deadline approachesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe UK government has presented Greater Manchester leaders with a deadline of 12pm on Tuesday to agree to take their region into tier 3 coronavirus restrictions. This is how events have unfolded over the past 11 days. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:09:34 GMT)

Rapid one-hour Covid tests begin at Heathrow airport
Coronavirus tests that cost £80 offered to travellers to Italy and Hong KongCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePassengers flying from London Heathrow to Hong Kong and Italy will be able to have a rapid Covid-19 test at the airport before checking in from Tuesday.The test costs £80 and results will be available within an hour. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 07:37:25 GMT)

Boots accused of harming social distancing by roping off HQ toilets
Employees at Nottingham head office say they were barred from toilets newly reserved for executivesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBoots roped off office toilets for executives during the pandemic, making it harder for ordinary employees to practise social distancing, the Guardian has learned.The pharmacy firm was criticised last week for “encouraging” staff to come into the head office in Nottingham, where cases are the highest in England, despite government guidelines to the contrary. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:43:50 GMT)

UK cities plan Covid-safe festivities as Christmas markets are cancelled
Many seasonal events have been axed, but light displays and trails will go ahead illuminating cityscapes, stately homes and gardens Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAs if we didn’t have enough reasons to hate Covid-19, now it’s threatening – Grinch-style – to steal Christmas, too. Growing numbers of cities are cancelling their Christmas markets. One of the most recent cities to abandon its plans is Manchester. Its Christmas spokesperson, councillor Pat Karney, told the Manchester Evening News last week that the markets had “not met our commercial and public health tests”.In December 2019, VisitEngland’s Christmas tourism survey showed more than 14 million Britons planned overnight trips during last year’s festive season and a third of those surveyed said they would be visiting a Christmas market. VisitEngland estimates these trips boosted the economy by nearly £3bn and predicts a 49% decline in domestic tourism spending overall this year. That’s before adding in the revenue loss to restaurants from not hosting larger groups and Christmas parties. A Welcome to Yorkshire poll found that 20% of hospitality businesses are cancelling planned activities and a third are scaling back. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:23:42 GMT)

Lombardy curfew aims to curb Covid hospital admissions rise
Coronavirus cases rising rapidly in Italian region badly hit by first wave of infectionsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAuthorities in Lombardy have been given the green light to impose a curfew as the Italian region hardest hit in the coronavirus first wave braces itself for a surge in hospital admissions.Campania in the south is seeking to adopt a similar measure. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:28:03 GMT)

Hunt on for future Covid mutations that cause treatments to lose potency
UK genetics consortium to monitor changes in virus to spot resistance to antibodiesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists are to increase surveillance for new coronavirus mutations amid concerns that future strains of the virus could develop at least partial resistance to antibody treatments and Covid-19 vaccines.There is no evidence that the mutations seen so far could help the virus evade vaccines or treatments now in development, but genetic analysis of circulating strains suggests that partially-resistant variants can emerge and spread among humans. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:00:00 GMT)

More than 100,000 Californians have bought a gun in response to Covid-19 crisis, report finds
Nearly half of the buyers were first-time gun owners, sparking fears about the risk of suicide and accidental injuriesMore than a hundred thousand Californians have bought a gun since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, a new report has found, in a surge of gun sales that has experts worried about the risk of suicide and deadly instances of domestic violence.Researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that 110,000 people in California purchased a firearm in direct response to the coronavirus. About 47,000 of the buyers were first-time gun owners. Buyers cited concerns over civil unrest, economic downturns, and the release of thousands from state prisons. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:00:04 GMT)

India at heart of global efforts to produce Covid vaccine
Country plays central role in development, manufacture – and possible distribution – of potential vaccinesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAs the largest global supplier of drugs and producer of 60% of the world’s vaccines, India has long been known as the “pharmacy of the world”.Now, as the frenzied hunt for a Covid-19 vaccine gathers momentum, the country is playing an increasingly strategic and central role in the development, manufacturing – and, crucially, possible future distribution – of several possible Covid shots. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 04:00:56 GMT)

'I don’t sleep. I'm afraid to open the post': Covid's continued effect for film industry workers
At the end of March, we spoke to professionals in the movie business caught up in the crisis. Seven months on, we find out how they’re faringThe response to our callout in March for the experiences of people working in the film industry affected by the growing coronavirus crisis was overwhelming.Many hundreds of people shared their stories with us; stories suggesting that the bigger picture back then – of Cannes continuing, of Chinese cinemas starting to reopen, of multiplex confidence holding up – might be optimistic. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:49:31 GMT)

A decade in the building, Madrid's showpiece hotel has everything ... except guests
Spain’s tourist sector – including the new Four Seasons hotel – is bearing the brunt of Covid, with the capital’s occupancy rates at 15%Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageMadrid’s first new grand hotel in almost half a century has more than enough to recommend it to even the most discerning and demanding of visitors.As well as a presidential suite for VIPs and their bodyguards, there is a spa, a handy branch of Hermès, and a restaurant by the three Michelin-starred chef Dani García, whose rooftop terrace appears to float high above the busy streets of the city centre. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:56:43 GMT)

Ay caramba! I watched 50 hours of new Simpsons so you don't have to
After years of decline, it’s only by watching newer episodes that you can appreciate the paradox of multiple Barts, the tragedy of Marge, and how the show echoes life in lockdownThis week, as the US plunges itself into further chaos and rancour, I will have my own reckoning. I will confront an ominous shadow that has long hung over me, and in so doing will seek to embiggen my spirit. This week, I will be watching … new episodes of The Simpsons.I say “new”, but really I am talking about everything after Season 15, when I finally gave up on the show. In general, The Simpsons can be split into four epochs: The Beginning (Seasons 1-3), where the family look like they have been drawn by the elderly Spanish woman who “fixed” the Jesus fresco; The Golden Age (Seasons 4-8), where every episode is perfection; The Descent (Seasons 9-14) when the show loses its way with shark-jumping plotlines (Principal Skinner is actually a fraud who stole an army colleague’s identity); and finally, the darkest era: The New Simpsons (Season 15 onwards), where most fans reach their limit of mediocrity and turn back to the warm embrace of reruns from season 4. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:00:04 GMT)

Electoral college explained: how Biden faces an uphill battle in the US election
Trump won the presidency in 2016 despite Clinton receiving almost 3m more votes, all because of the electoral college. How does the system work?When Americans cast their ballots for the US president, they are actually voting for a representative of that candidate’s party known as an elector. There are 538 electors who then vote for the president on behalf of the people in their state. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:42:36 GMT)

'I have been quiet for 50 years': standing up against sexual abuse at Celtic Boys Club
Many of the perpetrators have been jailed for their crimes. Now a number of survivors and their families claim that officials at Celtic knew about the sexual abuse and did nothingGordon Woods was an unlikely candidate to play for Celtic football club, since he came from the other side of Glasgow’s sectarian soccer divide. Born into a Protestant family, he, like his father before him, grew up supporting Rangers. But when he was 12, and had the opportunity to play for his home club’s historic rivals, Celtic – originally founded by a Catholic priest – Woods didn’t hesitate. Celtic Boys Club had such a stellar reputation in Scottish junior football that even his Rangers-mad father thought it was “perfectly fine” for his son to sign for the other side.It was 1967, and Woods was joining the club just after it became the first British side to win the European Cup. But it was here that he encountered the man who would cast a dark shadow over the rest of his life. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 05:00:57 GMT)

‘We’re like athletes’: the secret lives of giant-vegetable growers
From onions as big as babies to pumpkins that weigh more than a car, it has been a record-breaking year for oversize veg. But what motivates someone to grow an 8-metre beetroot – and is skulduggery involved?The pumpkins are as big as Cinderella’s carriage, and so heavy that a tractor is required to hoist them out of the earth. Immense, pockmarked marrows bulge from the ground like something from a phantasmagoric nightmare. Cucumbers soar to the height of a four-year-old. Onions bloat to the size of a head. You can have your giant vegetables in any size, as long as it is large, extra-large or extra-extra-large.For Britain’s giant-vegetable growers, 2020 has been a vintage year. Three world records were set on this year’s Grow Show tour in September: the world’s heaviest red cabbage (31.6kg), the world’s longest salsify (5.6 metres) and the world’s longest beetroot (8.6 metres). This month, Ian and Stuart Paton, 59-year-old twins from Lymington in Hampshire, grew the UK’s heaviest-ever pumpkin, which weighed in at a monstrous 1,176.5kg. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 05:00:58 GMT)

A dazzling, shocking indictment of America: What the Constitution Means to Me review
This funny, tragic and deeply unsettling one-woman tour de force shows who the US constitution serves – and who it lets down. The statistics alone are horrifyingHeidi Schreck tells us she first performed this show a decade ago to about 20 people, mostly friends, and has since rolled it out during presidential elections, supreme court hearings, marches and protests. “Every time I walk out,” she says, “the world has changed.”Although she is now walking out to an audience on the small screen, in a filmed version of the stage play that took Broadway by storm last year, the world has changed again. The pandemic has halted the play’s tour in America, while its exploration of the freedoms enshrined in the American constitution – who they serve or overlook – could not be more apt in the current blaze of populist politics, the aftermath of the Black Lives Matter movement and the forthcoming presidential elections. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:52:59 GMT)

‘Real life but better looking’: ultimate teen soap Hollyoaks turns 25
The show’s cast and creators discuss its evolution from British 90210 to taboo-busting teen TV, tackling everything from hard-hitting issues to laxative-spiked pizzasA car breaks down and explodes, a shirtless teen ejects a floppy disk, the police give chase to a man on a motorbike and there is a fight over an empty milk bottle. All of this happens, wordlessly, in the first five minutes of the opening episode of Hollyoaks, broadcast on 23 October 1995.Set in a fictional suburb of Chester populated by impossibly tanned and good-looking twentysomethings, the surreal and slightly camp first appearance on British TV screens of Channel 4’s youth-oriented series didn’t augur well. “Hollyoaks isn’t so much our first teen soap as a salute to British dentistry,” wrote the Guardian’s Stuart Jeffries in a review that described the show as “inept”. Yet, remarkably, this week it celebrates its 25th anniversary. In its quarter-century, it has managed to carve out a new form of British soap: aimed specifically at young people and addressing everything from drug overdoses to rape, radicalisation and domestic abuse, all at the teatime hour of 6.30pm. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:00:04 GMT)

US elections 2020: Joe Biden and Donald Trump's possible paths to power – podcast
Lauren Gambino, political correspondent for Guardian US, discusses which states Biden will need to win to take the White House, and what Trump will need to do to retain the presidencyWhat matters on 3 November is not which candidate gets more votes in the US election, but who secures the 270 electoral college votes needed to get to the White House. Lauren Gambino, political correspondent for Guardian US, talks to Anushka Asthana about Joe Biden and Donald Trump’s possible paths to power.In 2016, Trump pulled off a shock victory by becoming the first Republican presidential candidate in 28 years to win Michigan, Pennsylvania or Wisconsin - but by razor-thin victories says Lauren. Biden wants to get a higher turnout among African American voters and he wants to try and win back white, working-class former Democrat voters. Biden is also looking for support from the suburbs, particularly college-educated women and men who are increasingly turning away from Trump, and seniors. Biden has been trying to take back the narrative by reframing the race as “a campaign between Scranton and Park Avenue” and polls currently have Biden leading in these battleground states. The president is also struggling to maintain control of states he won a bit more easily in 2016 – namely Florida, Arizona and North Carolina. If Trump loses Florida, where Biden has a marginal lead, it will be almost impossible for him to win the White House. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 02:00:53 GMT)

Leaded petrol, acid rain, CFCs: why the green movement can overcome the climate crisis
Guardian environment correspondent Fiona Harvey discusses why the last 50 years of environmental action have shown how civil society can force governments and business to change and why that should give campaigners optimism for the future Faced with multiplying and interlinked environmental crises in the 2020s – the climate emergency, the sixth extinction stalking the natural world, the plastic scourge in our oceans – it is easy to feel overwhelmed, Guardian environment correspondent Fiona Harvey tells Rachel Humphreys. But it’s also easy to forget that environmentalism is arguably the most successful citizens’ mass movement there has been. Working sometimes globally, at other times staying intensely local, activists have transformed the modern world in ways we now take for granted. Campaigner Janet Alty tells Rachel about how her local campaign to ban lead in petrol became part of a much bigger movement called CLEAR – the Campaign For Lead-Free Air. Their campaign took years. But in 1983, a damning verdict from the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution prompted the UK government to decree that both petrol stations and manufacturers must offer lead-free alternatives. Leaded fuel was finally removed from the last petrol pumps in the UK in 1999. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 02:00:06 GMT)

Covid in the UK: a new north-south divide? - podcast
Strict new measures have been imposed on cities in the north of England this week in an attempt to control the increasing spread of Covid-19 infections. But the way the new restrictions have been rolled out has angered local leaders and residents alike, says Josh HallidayThis week has seen a major escalation of Covid-19 restrictions across the UK. A sharp rise in cases in Northern Ireland saw it return to full lockdown, pubs stayed shut across the central belt of Scotland and there were new travel bans imposed in Wales. But as Josh Halliday tells Anushka Asthana, it was in England that there was most controversy. Boris Johnson replaced his localised “whack-a-mole” strategy with a national plan that divides England into three tiers.From tonight London and parts of the Midlands have been moved up into the second tier preventing households from mixing indoors. But the toughest restrictions – and the greatest controversies – have centred on parts of the north of England. The Liverpool region has gone into tier 3 measures – with pubs, gyms and cinemas closed – but Greater Manchester has been resisting them fiercely. Its mayor, Andy Burnham, has given voice to a wider fury about a lack of warning, poor communication and inadequate financial support. Continue reading...
(Fri, 16 Oct 2020 02:00:26 GMT)

Why worry about no-deal Brexit? If Gove says it'll be better that's good enough for me | Marina Hyde
Internal borders, criminals on the loose – this is the utopia we’ve dreamed of. Who needs fresh vegetables anyway?The Derbyshire village of Coton in the Elms is the place farthest away from the sea in all the United Kingdom, suggesting it cannot be long before it is selected by Boris Johnson’s government as a border site. We are soon to be so in control of our borders that we will establish them in places long prevented from being borders by such iniquitous entities as the EU, and physical geography.In recent weeks, the government has announced exciting plans for “inland border sites” in places such as Warrington, Birmingham and Epping Forest. There will be no place too landlocked to be left out of lorry tailbacks and additional layers of red tape – previously the preserve of coastal elites – suggesting the government’s levelling up agenda is already deeply and meaningfully under way. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 09:56:30 GMT)

Without enough specialist staff, critical care beds are useless | Charlotte Summers
Somehow, this winter the NHS will need to look after Covid patients without undermining other servicesDr Charlotte Summers is a lecturer in intensive care medicine at the University of CambridgeCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn 2020 there have been announcements of the expansion of critical care capacity across the NHS, while at the same time headlines have detailed stories of hospitals running out of critical care beds. And this week dire warnings have emerged from places such as Manchester that the increase in Covid patients will soon mean there are no spaces left. So do we have enough beds or not? Like so many things in life, it is more complex than it might at first seem.A critical care bed is so much more than just a bed. To provide critical care requires physical bedspaces with the right infrastructure, equipment and staff – consultants, junior doctors, physiotherapists, nurses, occupational therapists, pharmacists, speech and language therapists, dieticians, clinical psychologists, ward clerks, data analysts and many more. Increasing the number of physical bedspaces, or the amount of available equipment, is the easy part. The staff are what really matter. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:00:07 GMT)

To be black and living in the British countryside means being an outsider | VV Brown
Ignorant, racist things can come out of the mouths of nice, smiley people in wellington boots. I’m trying to change thatOnly 2% of black people in Britain live in the countryside, according to a 2017 study. I am part of that 2%. I live in a small village just outside Milton Keynes, where I am the only woman of colour. Related: A message to my newborn son: for your sake, I have to take a stand against racism | Cephas Williams Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:47:44 GMT)

Outsourcing could work if it went to companies who value people over profit | Tom Lloyd Goodwin and Neil McInroy
From test and trace to care homes, it’s time to bring public services back in house and award contracts to social enterprisesEngland’s “world-beating” test-and-trace service has failed to materialise. Riddled with problems since its inception, it has been described as barely functional, with demand up to four times that of capacity and 90% of tests failing to hit the 24-hour turnaround target.But the problems with test and trace go far deeper than the incompetencies of this government. Over the last 30 years, Britain has shifted from having a market economy to being a market society where large swathes of public services are outsourced to the private sector. NHS test and trace is a prime example of this model, with management consultants such as Deloitte and Serco running large parts of a system where shareholder value appears to have trumped the needs of our frontline services. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:33:26 GMT)

Donald Trump may try to steal the election. We need to start preparing for that now | Ashley Dawson
According to the civil rights activist George Lakey, planning to defeat a coup can actually help reduce the chances of attempts to overthrow democracy Donald Trump has told us openly that he is planning to steal the election. In recent months he has explicitly declared that any election in which he does not win will have been rigged and illegitimate. He has claimed repeatedly and against all evidence that mail-in ballots are invalid. He and his allies in the US Senate are rushing a hard-right nominee through the US supreme court in order to ensure that the court will declare him the victor if there is any uncertainty in the results. Vice-President Mike Pence refused to say what he would do if Trump refused to accept the election results in his recent debate with Senator Kamala Harris. And, most notoriously, Trump has ominously encouraged neo-fascist goons like the Proud Boys to “stand back and stand by”. Related: Trump is right: this election is a choice between Thanos and Mr Rogers | Matthew Cantor Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:23:05 GMT)

Vietnam is not pitting economic growth against public health as it fights Covid | Tran Le Thuy
My country seemed to have all the ingredients for a coronavirus disaster, so what has it done right?On the evening of 7 March 2020, I received an email from the manager of the office building where I work in central Hanoi. It said the father of Nguyen Hong Nhung, the 17th Covid-19 patient in the country and first in the city, had dined on the third floor of the building the night before. Although he had twice tested negative for the virus, the building managers had reported his presence to the authorities. Seven staff who had been in contact with him were isolated and the building was immediately cleaned with disinfectant spray.To date, Vietnam (population: 95 million) has recorded 35 deaths from the novel coronavirus. My office building’s response was typical of the aggressive contact-tracing strategy the country adopted from the beginning of the pandemic. During the first phase, the government managed to cut off all the virus transmission routes promptly and comprehensively. Every infected person was hospitalised. People in contact with them were traced to the fourth layer and isolated. Their homes and neighbourhoods were put under local lockdown and sanitised by the army. The country has effectively been acting as if this were biological warfare. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:23:55 GMT)

David Squires on … a tale of two Jordans and rough justice on Merseyside
Our cartoonist looks back on a wild derby, unwanted workplace interactions and 57-year-old men dancing in empty stadiumsBuy a Squires cartoon in the Guardian print shopAnd take a look through David’s archive treasure trove Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 10:31:00 GMT)

Elliot Daly out of England's clash against Barbarians with mystery leg injury
Jones: ‘We’re not sure what it is – we’re running tests’Piers Francis back having recovered from coronavirusElliot Daly has been omitted from England’s 32-man training squad for Sunday’s clash with the Barbarians due to an unspecified injury.Also missing is Joe Marler, whose knee problem will take at least another two weeks to heal, meaning he will sit out the Barbarians clash and climax to the 2020 Six Nations against Italy six days later when England are playing for the title. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:40:52 GMT)

The absurdity of Mesut Özil’s exile, yet another top talent cut adrift | Jonathan Liew
Arsène Wenger must despair at the inefficiency in the game, embodied by the German midfielder’s omissionThere’s been something strangely disconcerting about seeing Arsène Wenger back on our screens, promoting his new book. Almost every interviewer he has faced has tried to lure him into some sort of indelicacy. Come on Arsène, settle some scores. Shit-talk Mourinho. Shit-talk Arteta. Shit-talk the board. Give us the full-body contact. Yet by and large, Wenger has refused to dance. His book is restrained, measured, high on facts and light on gossip, and has thus inevitably been panned as a crushing disappointment. Occasionally, however – much like his teams – he can still produce a moment of pure transcendence.On Friday night, Wenger was a guest on the Graham Norton Show, where he explained why footballers need a coach. “When people come together, it creates a magic,” he answered. “Sometimes the energy gets together, and they go up to a level where it becomes art. The art of flying together.” It was a beautiful, succinct image: his life’s mission, boiled down for a prime-time BBC One audience. Naturally, Norton quickly changed the subject to Wenger banning Mars bars. Freddie Flintoff told a story about drinking pints. The audience roared. Later, when the show’s Facebook page posted a clip from the programme, the one they chose was: “Arsène Wenger on his iconic fight with José Mourinho.” Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 08:10:01 GMT)

Manchester United's improvement buys breathing room for Solskjær | David Hytner
The performance in victory at Newcastle was reminiscent of their summer form and brings hope before the visit to PSGTo fully appreciate the highs, it is necessary to first plumb the depths and Manchester United appeared determined to test the theory on Saturday in the must-win Premier League game at Newcastle. On the back of three shambolic performances in the competition, the most recent being the 6-1 capitulation at home against Tottenham, the last thing they needed to do was give their opponents a head start.Still, they did so and, when David de Gea unfroze himself and Luke Shaw contemplated the reality of his second-minute own goal, United’s situation was heavy on bleakness. At that point the storm was coming for Ole Gunnar Solskjær – the questioning of his selection decisions, which had featured a few eyebrow-raisers; the bookmakers slashing his odds in the sack race; Mauricio Pochettino trending on Twitter. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 07:00:02 GMT)

Jason Holder urges cricket not to abandon Black Lives Matter message
West Indies captain feted at Cricket Writers’ Club awardsHe says: ‘I haven’t had one conversation in the IPL around it’Jason Holder has urged cricket not to abandon the Black Lives Matter message after his impressive captaincy of West Indies this year was recognised among the annual Cricket Writers’ Club awards.Holder’s side were the first international sports team to travel overseas during the Covid-19 pandemic and then led a public display of racial equality when they and England took a knee before the first Test in Southampton on 8 July. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:58:31 GMT)

The Spin | Cannonball Cricket: the indoor revolution that failed to take off
Once hailed as the future and huge in Australia, for some reason the idea was not a hit. But it could be back in 2021It was in this week in 1985 that the Guardian first reported on a new form of indoor cricket, apparently set to take the nation by storm. A centre had opened in Wellingborough, another in Ipswich was following the week later and two courts at Lord’s were coming on stream the week after that, to add to venues already open in Hounslow and Peterborough. The ambition was for 150 indoor centres to open within three years. It was, according to Gordon Jenkins of the Lord’s indoor school, “wonderful for cricket”.The following year the journalist Tim Heald published a book called The Character of Cricket, for which he travelled across England and Wales, talking to people involved in the game at various levels to establish a snapshot of the sport as it headed towards the final years of the century. “As far as cricket is concerned I think I may have seen the future,” he wrote of a visit to one of these centres. “I found it in a converted warehouse in Hounslow. This is the home of Cannonball Cricket – ‘It’s Fast! It’s fun! It’s for everyone!’ It was a warehouse, but now it is 25,000 square feet of indoor cricket ‘courts’. Its popularity is growing so fast that any claim made in this book will be out of date by the time it is published (unless I am hopelessly wrong and the whole thing has gone bust).” Colin Lumley, the Australian-born real tennis professional who managed the Hounslow centre, told the Times in 1985 “there are 250,000 Australians who play the game every week – and I think it will soon be as big here”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 09:30:02 GMT)

Tiger Roll back on the Flat as history chaser starts build-up to Grand National
Dual Aintree winner will return at Navan on ThursdayAll roads lead to Liverpool for hat-trick bid in springTiger Roll, the Grand National winner in 2018 and 2019, already has strong claims to be the most versatile National Hunt horse in training as well as the most popular, and he will attempt to break new ground once again on Thursday by recording his first win on the Flat at the age of 10.Gordon Elliott’s gelding is one of 10 declared runners for the Flower Hill Maiden Stakes over 14 furlongs at Navan, which will be his first run on the Flat since finishing second in a maiden on the all-weather surface at Dundalk in March 2016. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:00:18 GMT)

Arsène Wenger: 'A sense of anger, humiliation, hate … every defeat is still a scar on my heart' | Donald McRae
Former Arsenal manager reflects on his 22 years in charge of the club, how hurt he was by malicious rumours when he first arrived and how he has managed to move on from his life’s obsessionArsène Wenger still believes he could milk a cow but, as he says with a smile: “I haven’t tried for a long time. I might have lost the technique a little bit.” Wenger is one of the most humane and original thinkers in football and so it is not surprising that, moving beyond his “obsession”, we should spend 100 minutes talking about much more than the game that consumes him.Whether describing how he learned to milk cows as a boy in the Alsace village of Duttlenheim, or reliving his first memory as a five-year-old watching his local football team while clutching a prayer book, Wenger stresses his life has been built on the pillars of hard work and faith. “It’s amazing that you make your life with the values from childhood. I think all the champions I have met have been the same. They had the root of their motivations in childhood.” Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 23:00:46 GMT)

Just one in seven rape survivors expect justice in England and Wales
Victims’ commissioner survey also reveals about a third do not report rapes to police Just one in seven rape survivors believe they will receive justice by reporting a rape, according to a survey by the victims’ commissioner.The survey by Vera Baird gives a rare insight into the impact of rape in England and Wales and how it is prosecuted. It also found that about a third of the respondents had not reported what had happened to them to police, with 95% of those saying they had not done so because they did not think they would be believed. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 23:01:46 GMT)

Stormzy vest and 3D Covid virus among Designs of the Year nominees
Design Museum in London announces 74 contenders on show until 28 March 2021A vegan burger, the 3D rendering of the virus causing Covid-19 and the union flag stab-proof vest worn by Stormzy are contenders in the Designs of the Year, which its curator says tells the story of a tumultuous 12 months before the coronavirus pandemic.The Design Museum in London has announced the 74 nominees for the 13th annual exhibition and awards, which are drawn from designs created throughout 2019 and up to January 2020. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:35:46 GMT)

Anger as Environment Agency executive takes job at Southern Water
Critics say move an example of ‘cosy relationship’ between industry and regulatorOne of the most senior executives at the Environment Agency is leaving to join a water company that is under criminal investigation by the watchdog.The departure of Dr Toby Willison, the director of operations for the EA, to take up a role at Southern Water has angered campaigners seeking to reduce pollution in rivers and coastal waters. Willison has previously been the acting chief executive of the environmental watchdog. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 06:00:01 GMT)

Bank of England policymaker warns of rising economic risks and job losses - business live
Rolling coverage of the latest economic and financial news, as MPC member Gertjan Vlieghe says UK may need more stimulus to fight Covid-19 crisisLatest: BoE’s Gertjan Vlieghe sees downside risks risingVlieghe: Risk of large job losses as furlough scheme ends Introduction: Can Pelosi and Mnuchin reach a deal today?Wall Street fell last night as optimism fadedReckitt Benckiser: strong demand for cleaning and health products... 2.43pm BST Wall Street has opened a little higher, as traders cling to hopes of a US stimulus deal.President Donald Trump has fanned the flames of optimism, telling Fox News that he wanted a big deal, and would get doubters on his own side online:“I want to do it even bigger than the Democrats. “Not every Republican agrees with me, but they will.”Fiscal stimulus in the US also in a bit of a ‘game’ of its own, and we’ll see if the two sides come to some sort of conclusion today. I am not sure that will do much to foreign exchange market pricing, maybe a bit US dollar negative as some commodity currencies and emerging market currencies rally but the markets are going to wait for the election result for now with expectations low that an actual fiscal deal will happen before then. 2.24pm BST The latest Reuters polling of City economists shows that Gertjan Vlieghe is right to be worried about downside risks.Expectations for growth (or lack thereof) this year have hit their lowest point, with the economy expected to shrink by just over 10%.UK 2020 GDP expectations fall to new low in latest Reuters poll of economists (-10.1%) pic.twitter.com/cIxgTvDSZsMedian forecast for 2021 steady at +6.1% pic.twitter.com/lnl9Zng1q7 Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:44:22 GMT)

UK refuses to restart Brexit talks despite EU accepting its demands
No 10 unmoved even after Barnier’s offer prompts Gove to make U-turn at dispatch boxDowning Street has refused to restart Brexit deal negotiations despite Michael Gove performing a U-turn at the dispatch box in which he praised a “constructive move” by the EU minutes after declaring the talks “effectively ended”.The EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, seemingly agreed to all the government’s demands for the resumption of Brexit talks in pursuit of a deal – sending a tweet just as Gove was making a statement in the Commons castigating the bloc. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 17:48:11 GMT)

Monzo launches £180-a-year premium account despite downturn
Digital bank says it is confident its mainly younger customers will pay for extra servicesThe digital bank Monzo has launched a premium account, complete with a metal payment card, as it tries to convince more customers to pay for its services.Customers can pay £180 a year, or £15 a month for a minimum of six months, for the privilege of Monzo Premium. Its key features include travel and phone insurance, £600 of fee-free withdrawals abroad each month, a sleek white steel card and 1.5% interest on deposits up to £2,000. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 06:00:01 GMT)

Parole Board chief calls for high-profile hearings to be held in public
Proposed changes to system in England and Wales after John Worboys case aim to remove secrecy The head of the Parole Board has backed proposals to hold hearings to decide whether dangerous prisoners should be released in public, a significant shift from the current closed system.As part of a body of changes triggered by the ultimately quashed decision to release the black-cab rapist John Worboys, the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has launched a consultation into opening Parole Board hearings in England and Wales to a wider audience. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 09:54:02 GMT)

A third more deaths occurring at home than before Covid in England
ONS data suggests people with life-threatening conditions still shying away from hospitalsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAbout a third more deaths in England are occurring at home than before the Covid-19 pandemic, data has revealed, with the majority down to causes other than the coronavirus.In April, the UK government launched a campaign to encourage people who were unwell to seek medical attention, amid alarm that A&E attendances had plummeted. But the latest data, which extends into mid-September, suggests those with life-threatening conditions are still shying away from hospitals. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 13:44:38 GMT)

Government urged to sell cocaine and ecstasy in pharmacies
Campaigners say sale of drugs should be nationalised to undermine organised crimeCocaine, ecstasy and amphetamines should be “nationalised” and sold legally in government-run pharmacies to undermine global drug-related crime, a UK drugs reform charity has recommended.In a book – with a foreword written by the former prime minister of New Zealand Helen Clark – the drugs liberalisation campaign group Transform has sought to set out practical ways to sell the drugs in state-run special pharmacies as an alternative to what it calls the “unwinnable war against drugs”. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 23:01:47 GMT)

Former Blue Peter presenter John Leslie cleared in sexual assault trial
Leslie breaks down as verdict delivered after 23 minutes of deliberationsThe former Blue Peter presenter John Leslie has been cleared of a charge of sexual assault dating back more than a decade.Leslie sobbed and leant forward in the dock as a jury at Southwark crown court returned a not guilty verdict after deliberating for just 23 minutes following a week-long trial. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 15:17:15 GMT)

Angels and artillery: a cathedral to Russia's new national identity
Cathedral of the Armed Forces blends militarism, patriotism and Orthodox Christianity to controversial effectAngels hover above artillery, religious images are adorned with Kalashnikovs and the Virgin Mary strikes a pose reminiscent of a Soviet second world war poster. The imagery inside Russia’s vast Cathedral of the Armed Forces blends militarism, patriotism and Orthodox Christianity to breathtaking and highly controversial effect.An hour’s drive from Moscow, the cathedral has a metallic, khaki-green exterior, topped with golden domes and crosses that rise to 95 metres (312ft). Inside is the largest amount of mosaic of any church in the world, with many of the work depicting battles from Russian history and the second world war in particular. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 08:44:26 GMT)

US justice department expected to sue Google over accusation of illegal monopoly
Lawsuit will accuse tech company of abusing its position to dominate search and search advertisingThe US justice department is expected to file a lawsuit against Google on Tuesday, accusing the tech company of abusing its position to maintain an illegal monopoly over search and search advertising.The antitrust suit would be the most significant legal challenge to a major tech company in decades and comes as US authorities are increasingly critical of the business practices of the major tech companies. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:43:46 GMT)

New Yorker suspends Jeffrey Toobin for allegedly masturbating on Zoom call
Magazine says it is investigating matterToobin says ‘I thought I had muted the Zoom video’ in apologyThe New Yorker magazine has suspended one of its long-time staff writers, legal expert Jeffrey Toobin, while it investigates a report that he was allegedly masturbating during a Zoom work call earlier this month.“I made an embarrassingly stupid mistake, believing I was off-camera,” Toobin said in a statement on Monday about the situation, first reported by Vice. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 23:05:20 GMT)

Greece extends wall on Turkish border as refugee row deepens
Police say mobile sirens and surveillance cameras also used to deter crossings into EUGreece has begun extending a border wall along its frontier with Turkey to deter migrants from trying to enter the European Union, the Greek government has said, after a border standoff earlier this year which has helped drive Greek-Turkish relations to a dangerously low ebb.A total of 16 miles (26km) of wall will be added to the existing 6 mile fence along the Evros River, which forms much of the Greek-Turkish border, the government spokesperson Stelios Petsas said on Monday. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:12:38 GMT)

José Padilla, Ibiza DJ who defined chillout music, dies aged 64
Spanish DJ and producer, who became famous with the Café del Mar bar and compilation series, dies from colon cancerJosé Padilla, the Spanish DJ who helped define chillout music in the 1990s, has died aged 64 from colon cancer.An update on his Facebook page reads: “It is with great sadness that we bring you the news that José passed away peacefully in his sleep on Sunday night here on his beloved island of Ibiza … Now he has gone and the sunset in Ibiza will never be the same without him, but the beautiful music of José Padilla will stay with us forever.” Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 08:51:43 GMT)

Canadian town of Asbestos chooses new name
Site used to be one of the largest asbestos mines in the world but residents now want it to be called Val-des-SourcesResidents in the Canadian town of Asbestos have voted to rename their community to distance it from the once-ubiquitous mineral now recognised as being extremely poisonous and linked to lung and other cancers.The town, formerly home to one of the world’s largest asbestos mines, voted 51.5% in favour of changing its name to Val-des-Sources over five other options, according to results announced on Monday from a four-day referendum. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 09:46:51 GMT)

Hundreds of Victoria hotel quarantine guests must be screened for HIV over blood testing contamination fears
Authorities reveal blood glucose test devices were incorrectly used on 243 people, necessitating screenings for blood-borne diseases Follow our liveblogVictoria cases trend map; Full Australian Covid statsMelbourne stage 4 restrictions; Vic stage 3 rulesSign up for Guardian Australia’s coronavirus emailMore than 200 people who went through hotel quarantine in Victoria must be screened for HIV amid fears of cross-contamination from incorrect usage of blood glucose test devices.Several such devices were used on multiple people in quarantine between 29 March and 20 August, necessitating screenings for blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis B and C and HIV. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 01:39:40 GMT)

Presidential debate commission adopts rules to mute microphones
Candidates will be muted while the other has the floor, but rule changes have angered Trump campDonald Trump has complained that a rule change to mute microphones for part of his final televised debate with Joe Biden is “very unfair” and objected to the topics chosen by the moderator.When the two face off on Thursday for a final televised debate, each candidate will have their microphones cut off while the other is delivering responses to questions on American families, race in America, climate change, national security and leadership. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 07:46:59 GMT)

Actor Jeff Bridges being treated for lymphoma
Famous for his role of The Dude in The Big Lebowski, Bridges says the disease is serious but his prognosis is goodActor Jeff Bridges has said he is being treated for lymphoma and his prognosis is good.The 70-year-old channeled his The Dude character from The Big Lebowski in a statement on social media about the diagnosis on Monday evening, tweeting “New S**T has come to light”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 03:58:37 GMT)

Gulf royal accused of sexual assault must go, says Hay literature festival
Curator of Hay’s inaugural festival in Abu Dhabi has accused Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan of sexual assault, which he deniesHay literature festival will not return to Abu Dhabi until a senior Gulf royal is removed from his post as the United Arab Emirates’ minister of tolerance, after the curator of the inaugural Hay festival in the country accused him of sexual assault.Caitlin McNamara was the curator of the first sister festival in Abu Dhabi, which was feted as an opportunity to promote freedom of expression, human rights and women’s rights in the UAE. In an interview with the Sunday Times, she accused Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan of sexually assaulting her on 14 February, 11 days before the festival began. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:44:15 GMT)

The Guardian's climate promise: we will keep raising the alarm
Global heating is the emergency of our times. So we are taking action to confront itRead the Guardian’s climate pledgeSupport Guardian journalism today, by making a single or recurring contribution, or subscribingThe global climate crisis is the emergency of our times. Amid all the fear and sadness of 2020, it remains the overwhelming long-term threat to our planet and to everyone’s health and security.That is why we promise to keep reporting on it, raising the alarm and investigating the crisis and possible solutions, until we begin to see genuine systemic change. Continue reading...
(Mon, 05 Oct 2020 06:00:12 GMT)

The Arctic is in a death spiral. How much longer will it exist?
The region is unravelling faster than anyone could once have predicted. But there may still be time to act The great thaw: global heating upends life on Arctic permafrost – photo essayAt the end of July, 40% of the 4,000-year-old Milne Ice Shelf, located on the north-western edge of Ellesmere Island, calved into the sea. Canada’s last fully intact ice shelf was no more.On the other side of the island, the most northerly in Canada, the St Patrick’s Bay ice caps completely disappeared. Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Oct 2020 09:00:10 GMT)

Lemon juice, legumes and local activism: what green habits have you adopted in 2020?
Guardian supporters around the world tell us about the sustainable lifestyle changes that they have committed to during lockdown – and beyond Support Guardian journalism today, by making a single or recurring contribution, or subscribingWe started to order food from the local store for curbside pickup. We went online and bought a freezer. Bought a food vacuum sealer and ordered bulk orders from our favourite butcher and fish monger. Started to stock up on other staples. We have canned and vacuum stored fruit too. John Dorosiewicz, 65, Toronto, Canada Continue reading...
(Sun, 11 Oct 2020 19:16:45 GMT)

Six steps we are taking to confront the climate crisis
Last year, we vowed to prioritise climate journalism and cutting our own emissions. So much for promises: how are we actually doing this?In 2019, the Guardian made a pledge in service of the planet. We declared that the escalating climate crisis was the defining issue of our lifetime, and that quality, trustworthy reporting on the environment was an important tool to confront it. We promised to provide journalism that shows leadership, urgency, authority and gives the climate emergency the sustained attention and prominence it demands. Continue reading...
(Mon, 05 Oct 2020 06:00:14 GMT)

'This is mutilation': Chile's blinded protesters seek justice after Covid lockdown – video
More than 400 people in Chile have suffered eye injuries after being shot by police while protesting against inequality. They allege that police deliberately aimed teargas canisters and rubber bullets at protesters' faces. We follow Carlos Puebla, a former construction worker who was blinded in one eye and subsequently lost his job. With Chile hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, he is struggling to pay the rent and feed his family. As Chile exits lockdown and inequality grows ever deeper, he heads back to the streets to seek justice  Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 08:34:13 GMT)

Coronavirus: what has changed about what we know? – video explainer
Covid-19 has spread around the world, sending millions of people into lockdown as health services struggle to cope. From symptoms and long Covid to vaccines and treatments, the Guardian's health editor, Sarah Boseley, explains what we now know about the virus that we did not at the beginning of the crisisCovid vaccine tracker: when will a coronavirus vaccine be ready?Coronavirus – latest updates Continue reading...
(Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:00:04 GMT)

On the ground with Penguin, the Thai protest leader risking jail – video
The Guardian follows Parit Chiwarak, known as Penguin, one of Thailand's prominent protest leaders as he helps organise one of the biggest anti-government rallies in years. He and many other young people are risking prison to demand a significant democratic overhaul: they want the power and wealth of the monarchy curbed. Parit said he already faced 18 charges, including sedition, for his involvement in previous demonstrations. More rallies are expected in Bangkok on Wednesday The king and I: the student risking jail by challenging Thailand's monarchyThailand protests: everything you need to know  Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Oct 2020 05:55:42 GMT)

Why horror keeps creeping into black drama - video
Shows such as I May Destroy You, Atlanta and Insecure depict a wide spectrum of black life, from hilarity to mundanity – but all these shows, at times, also have an impending sense of doom. This feeling of horror, this looming sense of dread, is intentional, but it plays on the common tropes we've been conditioned to expect. Josh Toussaint-Strauss discusses why audiences expect bad things to happen to black characters and explores how a new generation of black creators are using horror to subvert these negative tropes  Continue reading...
(Thu, 15 Oct 2020 11:06:12 GMT)

Police brutality in Nigeria: what is the #EndSars movement? – video explainer
After days of fierce protests, Nigeria's government announced the dissolution of the infamous 'Special Anti-Robbery Squad', commonly called Sars, a police unit plagued with allegations of extrajudicial killings, theft and abuse - and in its place revealed plans to set up a Special Weapons and Tactics team called Swat to 'fill the gaps'. Amnesty International said on 14 October that at least 10 people have died in demonstrations against police brutality, as well as Sars itself and plans to create Swat. The Guardian's west Africa correspondent, Emmanuel Akinwotu, explains what sparked the #EndSars protests across the country, how the movement trended internationally on social media, and why demonstrators do not trust promises of reformNigeria to disband Sars police unit accused of killings and brutality Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Oct 2020 19:50:59 GMT)

Belarus: personal stories from a country in turmoil – documentary
Mass protests erupted across Belarus following the widely disputed election that put President Alexander Lukashenko in office for a sixth term. Three Belarusian filmmakers have documented personal stories of those caught up in the political turmoil. Maksim Shved was arrested, imprisoned and then released as the protests around him swelled. Ekaterina Markavets observes the psychological burden of her fellow citizens – she worked with professional psychologists who set up a volunteer support service for people affected by current events. Andrei Kutsila follows a celebrated Belarusian broadcast journalist who worked for state TV for nearly 40 years and who is now in hospital recovering from injuries sustained at a protest. All three filmmakers wonder what the future holds for their country and fellow citizens Continue reading...
(Mon, 05 Oct 2020 09:00:16 GMT)

Civil rights and QAnon candidates: the fight for facts in Georgia - video
Joe Biden won the nomination for president on the shoulders of older Black voters in the US south. But how do younger, progressive people of color feel about his candidacy in the southern state of Georgia, in play for the first time in decades? And will a dangerous campaign of QAnon disinformation have any bearing on the outcome of the election? Oliver Laughland and Tom Silverstone try to find outTroubled Florida, divided America: will Donald Trump hold this vital swing state? - videoBattle for the suburbs: can Joe Biden flip Texas? – video Continue reading...
(Thu, 15 Oct 2020 07:52:33 GMT)

Samuel L Jackson: 'A fullness comes upon me every time I land in Africa'
As their hard-hitting TV show Enslaved comes to an end, the star and his wife LaTanya Richardson talk about roots, race, revolution – and how to get rid of ‘the orange man’From Spike Lee joints to Tarantino thrillers, Star Wars to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Samuel L Jackson has done it all. Last year he was named “Hollywood’s most bankable star”, with films grossing a total of $13bn to date – more than the annual GDP of Iceland. The New York Times has described him as “his own genre”.And yet, despite having one of the most recognisable faces on the planet, until recently Jackson didn’t know quite where that face had come from. Like many African Americans, he was descended from people who were enslaved, leaving a question mark over his origins. That was until he embarked on a process of genealogy and DNA testing, which led him back to Gabon’s Benga tribe. “A lot of people tried to trace themselves and find out where they came from – all they could find out was maybe a country,” he explains. “So to go through what I went through – to find out what tribal ancestry I had and to be able to step back into – it was a really emotional, satisfying feeling. There’s a fullness that comes upon me, every time I land in Africa. As I step on the ground, everything sort of changes”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 05:00:59 GMT)

'Race is never far from the surface': Lesley Lokko on quitting New York
The Scottish-Ghanaian architect resigned as dean at the Spitzer school after less than a year citing ‘a lack of respect and empathy for black women’When the Scottish-Ghanaian architect Lesley Lokko was appointed to head the architecture school at the City college of New York last year, her arrival was hailed as bringing “renewed energy and an exciting new vision” to the school. But after less than a year in the post, Lokko has resigned, citing a “crippling workload and lack of respect and empathy for black women”.She became the dean of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer school of architecture in December 2019, after five years running the graduate school of architecture at the University of Johannesburg, the first such postgraduate school of architecture in Africa, which she founded in 2015. With 25 years of teaching experience across the UK, US and Africa, Lokko is widely regarded as one of the most progressive voices in architectural education. But the obstacles that she encountered in New York were unlike anything she had come up against before. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 05:00:57 GMT)

Love Island's Ovie Soko: 'It takes guts to live by your internal compass'
The TV show fan favourite who won hearts with his self-possession and sound advice has written a self-help book. How can we be more ‘dope’?Months before Ovie Soko applied to be a contestant on hit reality show Love Island, he set himself a goal. “I’m a huge believer in manifesting stuff. You know – that if I write it down it will happen,” the 29-year-old says. “So I wrote in my journal: ‘Provide a service or a product that helps people feel better about themselves and it will reach millions of people.’ I hadn’t a clue how I was going to do that. So to go on to Love Island later and get that reception, well, it was nuts. Blew me away. Still does. I don’t really get it but nonetheless, I do appreciate it.”Previously only known to basketball fans (at the time he was signed to Spain’s CB Murcia), Soko was instantly catapulted to fame. Almost overnight, he earned millions of fans who were struck by his self-possession and chilled personality in an environment where bravado and insecurities reign supreme. He became known for his wise words of comfort and advice to the other contestants, including pulling other men up on any disrespectful behaviour toward the women on the show (and there was a lot). It is in this vein that his debut book You Are Dope (subtitled “Let the power of positive energy into your life”) continues, offering guidance, advice, and inspiration on how to become the “dopest” person you can be. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 08:59:40 GMT)

Antrum review – creepy 'cursed film' mockumentary emanates eerie power
Enterprising film expertly conjures up a supposedly bewitched Bulgarian horror that has killed all those who have watched itYou probably haven’t heard of Antrum, such is the dread and secrecy that surrounds this “cursed film”. And that’s for your own good. Antrum was made in the late 70s and implicated in the mysterious deaths of several film festival programmers and foolhardy horror fans. Now, though, some documentarians have dug up a copy at an estate sale and are sharing it with anyone brave enough to watch.Or so goes the framing narrative of this part-found-footage-part-mockumentary horror. It would be wonderful to stumble across Antrum with little prior knowledge, in a FrightFest-style festival screening, perhaps, or as a midnight movie in your local cinema: remember back when The Blair Witch Project was still a “true story”? Sadly, the pandemic is denying many of us that pleasure, so we might as well openly appreciate the meticulous care that Antrum’s Canadian co-directors have put into fabricating the look of a 40-year-old, low-budget Bulgarian curio, utilising effects both technical and psychological. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:00:07 GMT)

Linda Ronstadt: 'I had to sing those songs or I was going to die'
The Mexican American singer discusses her heritage in a new film, and how important it is to be seen for who she really isFrom the start of her career, Linda Ronstadt has talked to the media about her Mexican heritage. “Back in 1967, Tiger Beat magazine asked me what my ambition was for my career,” she recalled. “I said I want to become a really good Mexican singer. But it wasn’t noticed or validated.” Related: Peter Frampton: 'I was kept high. If I needed cocaine, he made sure I had it' Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 06:20:01 GMT)

Hidden gems: here's a list of great things you can buy on local high streets
Independent retailers have proved to be treasure troves of delightful everyday itemsThis year, we’ve all been shopping closer to home, discovering or rediscovering our local high streets. And what we’ve found there has been something of a revelation: treasure troves of everyday hidden gems. So, to help inspire your own local lucky finds, here’s a showcase of secret discoveries from local high streets across the country, along with the shopkeepers who explain why they’re so passionate about stocking them. Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Oct 2020 10:29:12 GMT)

When it comes to watches – forget being smart and get wise with your time instead
As we seek more control over our digital lives, is it time to embrace the Japanese minimalist aesthetic – and trade in your smartwatch for a beautifully simple timepiece?In the smartphone age, checking the time can easily turn into wasting time. Who among us hasn’t innocently glanced at their phone, seen a notification, and wound up unintentionally tapping and scrolling through the best part of an hour?In the UK we spend on average 50 days of every year on our smartphones. for many, it’s not just one screen at any one time. As I write this at my desktop, I’m regularly checking my phone, yet it has exactly the same apps and sites as my computer. Six million people in the UK take it a step further, adding a smartwatch to this matryoshka of digital distractions. Continue reading...
(Thu, 17 Sep 2020 09:47:25 GMT)

'People want a job with purpose': why businesses are becoming more sustainable
Forward-thinking companies are increasingly focusing on reducing their carbon footprint in response to the climate emergency – and to attract a generation of talent with the same valuesPeatland restoration and the creation of native woodland in the Scottish Highlands is just one step in BrewDog’s mission to be carbon neutral. “Sustainability should not be a bolt-on; it needs to be a core part of everyone’s role, regardless of their job title,” says James Watt, BrewDog’s co-founder.As part of a £30m investment plan, the company is switching to a fleet of electric delivery vehicles and its brewery is wind-powered. Spent grain is transformed into fuel, and carbon dioxide produced during fermentation will be used downstream to carbonate beer. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 15:59:42 GMT)

Our first electric car: 'ZOE is part of the family now’
When Clare Grover and Gavin Gaskain decided to test out a Renault ZOE, it was love at first drive. Three years later, the couple tell Fiona Cowood how their EV has changed their livesThey may have had it for more than three years now, but Gavin and Clare are still as thrilled with their Renault ZOE – their first electric car – as they were when they drove it off the forecourt back in June 2017. “It’s just a really nice car,” says Clare. “Very quiet, really comfortable and I find it so easy to drive.”Many are wary of switching to an EV (electric vehicle) because they’ve heard the initial outlay can be costly, but Gavin and Clare are proof that going electric needn’t dent your pocket. “The total cost upfront was zero,” says Gavin. “We split the cost over four years, with 0% interest from Renault.” Running costs have been a pleasant surprise too. Their old car, an ageing people carrier, was costing £400 a month on diesel. Add in the cost of repairs, and it was amounting to a small fortune. “The ZOE is much cheaper to run day-to-day,” says Gavin. “We’ve worked out it runs at about a penny per mile.” Continue reading...
(Fri, 25 Sep 2020 16:01:33 GMT)

What store-cupboard basics should I stock up on for winter?
Long-lasting and versatile ingredients will see us through the winter – grains, pulses, warming spices – and remember to make good use of the freezerWhat should I have in my store cupboard and freezer now to make cooking easier?Katie, LeedsNow is the time to get those soups, stews and dals going, so making space (in moderation. No stockpiling, please) for lentils, coconut milk, warming spices (turmeric, cinnamon, ginger, cumin) and tinned tomatoes is a good starting point. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:00:07 GMT)

Bootylicious: the unexpected return of the wellington boot
Practical but stylish, wellies have been embraced by Versace, Kate Middleton and Timothée Chalamet and are a key component of the ‘cottagecore’ trendForget stilettos. Thanks to the pandemic’s effect on lifestyles, fashion-conscious consumers may finally be seeing the benefit of practical footwear. Wellies – worn by toddlers, dog walkers and festival-goers – are now the choice of the stylish, too. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 05:01:57 GMT)

Nigel Slater’s recipe for mushrooms, chickpeas, tahini
Baked portobello mushrooms in a seedy, herby, spicy dressingSet the oven at 200C/gas mark 6. Remove the thick stalks from 2 very large (or 4 medium) field mushrooms, then put the mushrooms gill side up on a baking tray. Score the inside of each mushroom with a kitchen knife in a lattice pattern. Pour a generous tbsp of olive oil into each. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:00:05 GMT)

La Rambla: plans to transform Barcelona's tourist rat run into a cultural hub
An ambitious project is under way to turn one of the world’s most overrun streets into an the ‘immersive art centre of southern Europe’Once a byword for the worst excesses of overtourism, Barcelona now aspires to be a role model for other cities that once put all their eggs in the tourist basket. It is reinventing itself and reclaiming public space for the city’s residents, starting with its most famous boulevard, La Rambla.“The crisis has exposed the weakness of a model based on one economic sector, tourism,” said Jordi Rabassa, the councillor for Ciutat Vella, the oldest and most-visited part of the city. “La Rambla is the centre of this economic monoculture, and we’re working towards bringing local people back to the city’s most emblematic street.” Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 05:30:00 GMT)

Why won’t Virgin Media complete my broadband installation?
The company won’t phone when promised or provide an explanationI have been trying to switch to Virgin broadband because it is by far the fastest in my area. The installation was booked for mid-August and, as at that point a full connection was not possible, we were connected to our neighbour’s cable with their consent.Since then, Virgin Media claims it is unable to complete my installation or deal with problems with the service. Apparently its system shows the installation as complete and our account as active. In addition, the company has repeatedly failed to phone when promised, turn up in the agreed time slot, arrive at the right address or provide any explanation for anything. I am unsure what to do next, other than to send another complaint. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 06:00:02 GMT)

Tourism sector in Wales 'desperate' as holidays cancelled ahead of lockdown
The two-week Covid firebreak starting on Friday puts even more tourism jobs at risk• Coronavirus – latest updates• See all our coronavirus coverageTourism businesses in Wales are spending Monday cancelling customers’ holidays after the first minister Mark Drakeford announced a two-week national lockdown designed to be a “short, sharp shock to the virus to slow down its spread”.Under the new restrictions no one will be allowed to travel into Wales and all hospitality businesses will have to close. Continue reading...
(Mon, 19 Oct 2020 15:22:52 GMT)

Have you been asked to provide proof of identity when socialising in UK pubs?
We’d like to hear from people who’ve been asked whether they have been asked to share proof of where they live when socialising in UK pubsThe hospitality industry has been working out how to deal with the various lockdown instructions coming from the government.With many people now prevented from meeting in pubs, restaurants and other businesses with anyone from outside their households, we would like to hear from anyone who has been told they must provide proof where they live with the people they are socialising with. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:18:50 GMT)

Tell us: how will you be affected by the national lockdown in Wales?
We’d like to hear how the two-week ‘firebreak’ in Wales may affect you. Share your views and experiences with usA temporary national lockdown will be imposed in Wales, the Welsh first minister, Mark Drakeford, has announced.It’s hoped the two-week “firebreak” thoughout Wales which comes into force on Friday at 6pm – until Monday 9 November – will help prevent the spread of coronavirus. About 2.3 million people in Wales are already living under local lockdown rules, in 15 of Wales’s 22 counties plus Bangor and Llanelli. Continue reading...
(Mon, 21 Sep 2020 14:27:43 GMT)

UK students: what is the impact of corona on university life?
If you’re a new arrival or returning student, we’d like to hear from you. Share your experiences of university during the academic year We’d like to hear how students are coping amid spikes in coronavirus and the introduction of new measures by universities to mitigate against the spread of coronavirus. Around one million students are expected to to head to UK universities in September and October and the virus has meant that it will be a very different experience for everyone. Many universities have put online lectures online, and students will be expected to abide by rules on social distancing. Continue reading...
(Fri, 11 Sep 2020 12:12:17 GMT)

Living in the UK: have you been made unemployed during the pandemic?
We would like to hear from those who have lost their jobs due to coronavirus – particularly young and older workersSince June, 1.5 million people have been out of work in the UK, rising at the fastest rate since records began, with the youngest and oldest workers bearing the brunt of the employment crisis.We would like to hear from people who have lost their jobs as a result of coronavirus. We are particularly interested in young and older workers who are especially affected, as well as those who have worked or now work in manual jobs. Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Oct 2020 08:52:14 GMT)

I had the best body I've ever had – so why did I feel so much shame?
Men are shamed into hating anything feminine in themselves and in the world, and if they dare question that hatred, they are forced to relive the shameIn a recently resurfaced 2007 interview from The Ellen Show, Ellen Degeneres is shown upbraiding guest Celine Dion for allowing her then six-year-old son to grow his hair long. “He is beautiful,” Ellen says, “but look at that hair! When are you gonna cut that hair?” Initially, Dion’s feathers get ruffled (“Do you have a problem with that?” she shoots back) but ultimately she seems hesitant to take anything resembling a political position. What’s more surprising is Ellen’s policing of gender expression here – particularly when considering that she herself is a gay woman who openly flouts gender norms.But patriarchy and its prerogatives are not solely the province of men. Women can and often do claim them – just as any disenfranchised group will do what they can to cling to power. Throughout my childhood, I watched my own mother turn male prerogatives against herself without realizing it. There was an invisible line she would never cross, and I learned not to cross it either. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 06:00:01 GMT)

In America’s oil country, men losing their jobs are suffering in silence
As rigs close down, suicide numbers go up. With a local industry in shambles, a mental health crisis is brewingOn the road to Mooringsport, Louisiana, the billboards advertise, in a one-mile stretch, a pro-life pregnancy helpline, a Christian suicide helpline, and a Covid-19-era performance by Stormy Daniels at the Shreveport Hustler’s Club on 22 and 23 March. It’s late August, dawn, and I can’t tell yet whether this place is timeless or a time capsule. It is, to say the least, a land of contradictions – one where the life above ground was built almost entirely from the dead matter below it. Here, oil is king.I’m on my way to meet Joshua Patrick, a recently laid-off 42-year-old “roughneck”, as he proudly refers to himself, and father of five. He says he’d seen the downturn of oil coming for years – “every boom seems to bring a bust sooner or later.” An aphorism, an axiom, an industry story in a single line. The edges are starting to show some fray. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 05:00:58 GMT)

10 million snowblowers? Last-ditch ideas to save the Arctic ice
Some of the solutions sound fantastical – but their proponents argue that there are precious few other optionsTime is running out for the Arctic. The region continues to warm at two or three times the global rate and scientists now predict that we could see Arctic summer ice disappear as early as 2042.As the realization sets in that existing emission reductions and renewable energy programs in place won’t be enough to save the Arctic, alternative geoengineering projects have gained traction as scientists look for a last-ditch solution. Some of them sound fantastical – but their proponents argue that there are precious few other options. Continue reading...
(Tue, 20 Oct 2020 07:00:02 GMT)

Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2020