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Doctor who worked at same firm as Ian Paterson accused of botched operations
Exclusive: Michael Walsh treated patients at hospital run by Spire, which employed rogue breast surgeonA doctor who worked at the same private healthcare firm as the rogue breast surgeon Ian Paterson has been accused of subjecting scores of his patients to unnecessary operations that left many in pain, traumatised and unable to work, the Guardian can reveal. Michael Walsh, a shoulder surgeon, was sacked by Spire Healthcare, which reported him to the General Medical Council (GMC) after numerous patients and some of his colleagues raised concerns about his work. An investigation it undertook uncovered examples of Walsh harming patients by performing surgery on them unnecessarily or badly. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 19:00:36 GMT)

Politicians condemn press intrusion after Caroline Flack's death
ITV says Sunday’s Love Island will not be broadcast as calls mount for regulation of traditional and social mediaPoliticians have condemned press intrusion, calling for more regulation of both traditional and social media after the death of TV presenter Caroline Flack. The former Love Island presenter is understood to have taken her own life on Saturday at her home in Islington, London. She had been charged with assaulting her partner and was due to stand trial in several weeks’ time. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 18:27:10 GMT)

Storm Dennis triggers record number of flood warnings in England
Disruption caused by strong winds and severe flooding across UK likely to last for daysStorm Dennis – live updatesLarge parts of Britain are facing days of disruption after one of the worst winter storms of recent times triggered an unprecedented number of flood warnings and left thousands of homes underwater.Major incidents were declared in south Wales and parts of England as Storm Dennis brought heavy rain and strong winds to much of the country. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:24:17 GMT)

Calls for Tory aide to be sacked over 'enforced contraception' remarks
Labour condemns Andrew Sabisky’s views on pregnancy, race and women’s sport Labour is calling for the immediate sacking of a Tory adviser over his controversial remarks about pregnancy, race and women’s sport.Oxbridge-educated Andrew Sabisky is working as a No 10 adviser, having been appointed after chief aide Dominic Cummings put out a job description for “misfits and weirdos” to join him in trying to shake up government. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 20:41:39 GMT)

BBC pundit taken off air after criticism of Derby's 'young black lads'
Craig Ramage claimed players need ‘pulling down a peg or two’Derby’s Max Lowe and Kick It Out issue strong rebukesThe BBC has said it will no longer use the pundit Craig Ramage after the former midfielder criticised Derby County’s “young black lads”, saying they needed “bringing down a peg or two”.The 49-year-old made the comments, which Kick It Out condemned as “thoughtless racist stereotypes”, on BBC Radio Derby’s Sportscene show after Saturday’s 1-1 draw with Huddersfield Town. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 20:58:26 GMT)

Brexit: Britain and EU 'will rip each other apart' in trade talks
French foreign minister says it will be hard for UK to strike deal by end of year given differencesBritain and the European Union are going to rip each other apart in talks over a future trade deal, the French foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, has predicted, while also holding out hope that UK defence co-operation with Europe will continue.Speaking at the Munich security forum, he added it would be tough for Britain to achieve its aim of a free trade deal by the end of the year given the differences between the two sides. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 14:20:28 GMT)

British woman repeatedly trafficked for sex after Home Office failures
High court judge intervenes to prevent victim of county lines sex exploitation being made street homeless after refusal to find her safe housingA young and highly vulnerable British sex trafficking victim was re-trafficked by county lines drug gangs on multiple occasions after the Home Office repeatedly refused to fulfil its legal obligation to provide her with safe accommodation.A high court judge was forced to intervene to compel the Home Office to house the woman, who was about to become street homeless. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 12:55:26 GMT)

Volunteer firefighter Paul Parker, who swore at Scott Morrison, says he has been sacked
In an interview on Channel Ten’s The Project, Parker said he had been told to leave RFS leading to the hashtag #IStandWithPaulParker trending in Australia A volunteer firefighter who told the prime minister to “get fucked from Nelligan” in a viral news clip says he was sacked from the New South Wales Rural Fire Service for foul language.Paul Parker told Channel Ten’s The Project on Sunday that he was chastised by the RFS for directing the expletive toward Scott Morrison and that he had been booted from the organisation, contrary to reports from the time that he had been stood down due to exhaustion. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 21:21:31 GMT)

Coronavirus: more than 3,000 Britons tested
Eight of nine people who tested positive successfully treated and discharged from hospitalThe number of people tested for coronavirus in the UK has passed 3,000, according to official figures.Statistics from the Department of Health and Social Care show that 3,109 tests had been carried out in the UK as of 2pm on Sunday, an increase of 117 on the 2,992 reported on Saturday. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:33:53 GMT)

William Barr must quit over Trump-Stone scandal – former justice officials
More than 1,000 public servants decry presidential interferenceAide Conway claims justice system rigged against TrumpRobert Reich: assaulting justice, Trump has out-Nixoned NixonMore than 1,000 former US justice department officials, including some of the top government lawyers in the country, have called on attorney general William Barr to resign in the wake of the Roger Stone scandal. Related: William Barr: how the attorney general became Trump's enabler-in-chief Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 20:24:09 GMT)

Human composting could be the future of deathcare
Washington becomes first US state to legalise practice as interest in green burials surges in UKIt is viewed as a fitting end for a banana skin or a handful of spent coffee grounds. But now people are being urged to consider human composting and other environmentally friendly “deathcare” options.Speaking before a talk at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Seattle on Sunday, Lynne Carpenter-Boggs, a professor of soil science and sustainable agriculture at Washington State University, said: “Death certainly isn’t the biggest environmental impact we have in our life process. But we can still look for new alternatives.” Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 19:00:37 GMT)

Why are millions of children in the UK not getting enough to eat?
Levels of food insecurity in Britain are among the highest in Europe. Here, campaigners and struggling families explain why food banks alone won’t solve the problemSarah Batts shows me up a narrow staircase and into her one-bedroom flat. It’s in the converted roof space in a not-great area of Eastbourne. The flat is crammed full of baby equipment for her 15-month-old daughter, Scarlette. Stiflingly hot in late summer, there’s nowhere to sit and eat a meal, partly because the place is tiny and partly because, in common with households with small children across the land, every flat surface including the dining table is covered with stuff.After working in a pet shop for 14 years, Batts, 38, now can’t hold down a job due to poor health. In any case, since her daughter’s birth she has looked after Scarlette on her own. She is dependent on benefits and gets around £250 per week. Her monthly rent is £580, then there’s bills, and she usually allows £25 for her weekly food shop. Budgeting, she says, “is pretty hard, because you don’t get that much. I probably do spend way too much on food.” She orders groceries online because she can’t drive and her illness means she struggles to leave her flat. “I worry about money pretty much all the time,” she says. “I always end up with nothing at the end of the month.” Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 12:00:28 GMT)

‘We’ve had enough’: Caroline Flack’s death turns spotlight on tabloids once again
Despite calls for a ‘Caroline’s law’ against media intrusion, there is little sign change is likelyThe death of Caroline Flack has once again focused attention on the behaviour of the British tabloids, who had followed every twist and turn of her private life – coverage, critics argue, that fed vicious online abuse of a clearly vulnerable woman.Within hours of the announcement, hundreds of celebrities and members of the public had backed calls for a “Caroline’s law” against excessive media intrusion while Laura Whitmore, who succeeded Flack as host of Love Island for the current series, suggested media coverage contributed to her friend’s death. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:00:33 GMT)

A climate emergency: what happens when the taps run dry?
In the second episode of The Frontline, a major series on how Australians are already experiencing the climate crisis, we show what daily life looks like in one of dozens of Australian towns that have run out of drinking water Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 19:00:37 GMT)

A drug can stop HIV infection – so why isn't it available on the NHS in England?
Major studies have shown that the prophylactic PrEP effectively ends the threat of contracting HIV. But gay men and other users are currently left to self-source it onlineIn August 2017, George was living in Glasgow when he received a call from his partner in South America. They had remained together despite the distance, a physical rather than emotional separation. George answered, and the voice on the other end of the phone dissolved into tears.“He had just been diagnosed with HIV,” says George. “I was worried about him. I was worried for myself and my future health. And I was worried about what my family would think.” Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:00:33 GMT)

Hell-on-Sea: how a drugs gang took over a sleepy Devon town
For more than a decade, a group of criminals brought drugs, fear and violence to DawlishRetired couples and a smattering of teenagers bunking off school watch the grey swell of the Channel under a pale winter sky. The gaudy amusement arcades of penny-pushers and flashing gambling machines are almost completely deserted. The bored-looking staff in the ice-cream parlours and takeaways gaze into their phones, waiting for customers.Dawlish on the south Devon coast is everything you might expect of a seaside resort in February. Yet this ostensibly sleepy West Country town was the nerve-centre of a violent gang from the north-east who over a decade built a brutal drug empire worth at least £1m while also preying on vulnerable young women who fell under their spell. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 08:19:24 GMT)

YouTube at 15: what happened to some of the platform’s biggest early stars?
As YouTube celebrates its 15th birthday, we talk to five early adopters about how the all-singing all-dancing platform has evolvedLate on the evening of 14 February 2005, Jawed Karim, Chad Hurley and Steve Chen registered the website YouTube.com. Two months later, when the first video (of Karim briefly describing the elephant enclosure at the San Diego Zoo) was uploaded, a platform was launched that has gone on to change the world.Today, more than 2bn of us visit YouTube monthly, and 500 hours of footage is uploaded every minute. That’s a far cry from the 18-second video that started it all. Its stars are multi-millionaires: YouTube’s highest earner in 2019 was an eight-year-old called Ryan, who netted $26m. The number of creators earning five or six figures has increased by more than 40% year on year. At first, users earned a few hundred pounds for mentioning products in their videos; now they can make hundreds of thousands, and much more through exclusive brand deals. Not many like talking about their income: it makes them less relatable. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 12:00:28 GMT)

Confront your fears … and four other ways to stop procrastinating
Address your perfectionism, make a small starting step and break the cycle that is holding you backClare Evans, a productivity coach and author of Time Management For Dummies, says the main reasons for procrastinating are fear, perfectionism and not knowing where to start, or feeling overwhelmed or unmotivated. If it is fear, whether unfounded or founded, Evans says to confront the worst-case scenario: “It may not be as bad as we think.” Figure out what knowledge or skills you are lacking, and delegate if you can. If you’re paralysed by the need to get it right, Evans suggests honestly confronting whether “‘perfect’ is really what’s needed” – or if it is more important just to get it done. “Sometimes we procrastinate over tasks that aren’t really that important.” Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 15:00:32 GMT)

'Westlessness': is the west really in a state of peril?
Top diplomats disagreed over the global relevance of the west at the Munich security conferenceThe chosen theme of the Munich security conference – once a party for Nato and now a Davos for the world’s diplomats – was “westlessness”. The organisers wanted to capture the fear that the west is now so divided and challenged by the rise of China its whole existence has become imperilled.It was not a concept that won universal acclaim. Margrethe Vestager, the EU vice-president, hit back in one session: “I never thought about ’westlessness’ before. Are we here discussing our own depression and asking the rest of the world to join in as a sort of collective mindfulness exercise? I don’t really don’t get this.” European values – the rule of law and the integrity of the individual – had spread across the world, she insisted. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 14:37:49 GMT)

Who killed Swedish prime minister Olof Palme?
After a night at the cinema in 1986, Olof Palme was assassinated on Stockholm’s busiest street. The killer has never been found. Jan Stocklassa discusses whether novelist Stieg Larsson’s theory can provide any answers. And: the first same-sex couple to get married in Northern IrelandOn 28 February 1986, the Swedish prime minister Olof Palme was murdered by a single round from a gun, shot into his back. He had been on his way home from the cinema with his wife, Lisbet. Although more than 20 witnesses saw the gunman, the murder has never been solved.Anushka Asthana talks to the journalist Jan Stocklassa, who has spent years working on the story, including examining the huge archive of research assembled by the late crime novelist Stieg Larsson. Stocklassa is now convinced Palme’s assassination lies in Larsson’s theory. Continue reading...
(Fri, 14 Feb 2020 03:00:19 GMT)

What is it like to come out late in life? – podcast
Nicholas McInerny, a writer, came out as gay aged 45 and after nearly 20 years of marriage. It took a huge toll on his family and it all came flooding back last week when the TV presenter Phillip Schofield went public with his story. Also today: Alex Hern on the government’s plans to regulate the internet When Nicholas McInerny was 45 he sat down with his family at the dinner table and announced that he was gay. He says it was one of the most difficult things he has ever done. Last week, when the TV presenter Phillip Schofield came out publicly it brought all those emotions flooding back. He tells Anushka Asthana that after growing up at boarding school in the 1970s where homophobic bullying was rife, he found himself struggling with his identity throughout adulthood. Now remarried, he looks back at his decisions without regret about the final outcome, but with sorrow at the hurt he caused along the way. Nicholas now hosts the Rainbow Dads podcast and a volunteer with the LGBT helpline Switchboard. Continue reading...
(Thu, 13 Feb 2020 03:00:50 GMT)

Back from the brink of death: reversing a heroin overdose
Anti-overdose drug naloxone has been in clinical use since the 1970s but not always where it’s needed most. The Guardian’s Jamie Grierson visited Redcar in North Yorkshire where a group of former drug users provide at-risk people with kits that could save their lives. Plus George Monbiot on Storm Ciara and the flooding that has once again devastated parts of EnglandThe anti-overdose drug naloxone has been around since the 1970s but while heroin and other opioids are easy to find in towns and cities in Britain, this lifesaving antidote hasn’t been. North-east England has been affected by more drug overdose deaths than anywhere else in the country.Now a team of former drug users, in partnership with the charity Addaction, is patrolling the streets of Redcar offering at-risk people naloxone kits that could save their lives. Those who have administered it say it is like witnessing a miracle. Continue reading...
(Wed, 12 Feb 2020 03:00:21 GMT)

Manchester City are suffering over two-season Uefa ban, says Mikel Arteta
Arsenal manager worked as City’s No 2 under Pep Guardiola‘I just want the best for Manchester City, I really do’Mikel Arteta has said Pep Guardiola and Manchester City are “suffering” after Uefa handed the club a two‑season ban from the Champions League and a €30m (£25m) fine.The Arsenal manager, who worked as Guardiola’s assistant for three years until December, said he was shocked at the severity of the sanctions and had been in contact with Guardiola. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 20:31:40 GMT)

Morgan takes control as England chase down South Africa and the T20 series
Third T20: South Africa 222-6; England 226-5, 19.1 oversBairstow and Buttler also weigh in with half-centuriesWhat a series, what a run chase and what a crick in the neck watching the ball sail through the Centurion skies. With its short boundaries and much-vaunted “thin air” SuperSport Park is a place for hitting sixes. There were 28 of them on an afternoon when cricket was transformed into a game of the skies and England chased down South Africa’s 222 in thrilling fashion.The decisive hand came from Eoin Morgan, who walked out with the third T20 international slipping away at 140 for three in the 13th over and just kept on pumping the ball over the rope. He ended on 57 not out off 22 balls with seven sixes, all but 10 of his runs scored on the leg-side as he targeted that boundary with relentless precision. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:02:42 GMT)

George Ford warns England: 'Ireland's Farrell is a very competitive guy'
• Fly-half knows coach will have Ireland firing at Twickenham• Ford: ‘We never like losing matches particularly at home’George Ford has not forgotten the last time Ireland came to Twickenham during the Six Nations. Two years ago they inflicted what was at the time England’s first home defeat under Eddie Jones, doing so emphatically to clinch the grand slam and round off a thoroughly miserable campaign for Ford and co.Whether Jones, or his captain Owen Farrell, addresses the squad about it this week, that stinging defeat is likely to serve as motivation for England on Sunday. They have their campaign back on track following the disappointing defeat by France with the scrappiest of victories in Scotland but there remains a sense England have not yet got going. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 22:18:49 GMT)

Jemma Reekie's 'special kick' could take her to Olympic glory, predicts coach
Scot wins tactical battle in 1500m at Glasgow Grand PrixReekie has broken three British records this monthJemma Reekie has a “pretty special kick” – so devastating it could take her all the way to Olympic glory, her coach Andy Young has predicted.The 21-year-old Reekie has been the sensation of the indoor season, smashing the British 800m, 1500m and mile records since the start of February. But on Saturday she showed another side of her ability, coming from behind to win a tactical race against a high-class 1500m field in Glasgow with a stunning 30.1sec last lap. Afterwards Young was effusive in his praise for his athlete – and her kick. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 22:30:41 GMT)

Arsenal turn on the style in second half to thrash Newcastle
As the last few seconds of this game played out, as Arsenal knocked the ball around without inhibition and Newcastle chased them without conviction, a strange and discomfiting sensation seemed to descend on the Emirates Stadium. You might call it, for want of a better word, satisfaction. Not happiness, as such: Arsenal don’t really do happiness. But the soft and sleepy contentment of a game well won, an afternoon without qualms or catastrophic injuries or late drama or existential angst: this was the unfamiliar part. Related: Tottenham go fifth as Son Heung-min punishes late Aston Villa error Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 18:51:17 GMT)

Porto's Moussa Marega gives Vitoria fans finger after apparent racist abuse
Marega raised his two middle fingers to the crowdPorto went on to defeat Vitoria Guimarães 2-1Porto striker Moussa Marega had to be restrained by teammates as he tried to walk off the pitch after he was apparently racial abused during his side’s 2-1 win over Vitoria de Guimarães. Marega scored what turned out to be the winner on the hour mark but felt unable to continue, his final act was to raise his two middle fingers to the home supporters.After scoring Porto’s second, Marega celebrated his goal by pointing to his skin. In response Vitoria fans aimed abuse and threw seats from the stand at Mali international. Marega even celebrated with one of the discarded plastic seats but then made his way to the side of the pitch, with his thumbs down and seemingly booing the home supporters. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 21:32:47 GMT)

Students who complain about abuse on campus are being ‘wokesmeared’ | Nesrine Malik
Far from being hotbeds of political correctness, universities are ignoring victims of sexual harassment, racism and bullyingAs the Windrush scandal was breaking, it became clear that there were two parallel perceptions of the UK’s immigration system. Those who had been mangled by the Home Office machine knew the truth: that the system was cruel and broken. The other view, more popular but fabricated, was that the country’s immigration policy was lax, gullible and open to abuse.The overall result is a climate unreceptive to the anxiety of students on British campuses Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:42:08 GMT)

Ben Jennings on Dominic Cummings' plans to axe BBC licence fee — cartoon
Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 18:29:18 GMT)

The Guardian view on a comeback for Keynes: revolutionary road | Editorial
The British economist’s ideas remain as important today as they ever wereThis month, 83 years ago, perhaps the greatest-ever economist published his greatest work. John Maynard Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money did not invent monetary analysis. But it changed the way that money, finance, demand and unemployment in a modern economy were understood. Such is its enduring power that, three years ago, it was voted the most significant British academic book of the modern age. Keynes knew what he was on to when he wrote The General Theory. In a letter to the playwright and activist George Bernard Shaw, he wrote: “I believe myself to be writing a book on economic theory, which will largely revolutionise … the way the world thinks about economic problems.”Keynes put his theory into practice. Entering the Treasury in 1940, he was central to the creation of the British government’s plans for the reconstruction of the economy after the second world war. He was not the only person involved, but his blueprint of a state-guided investment policy accompanied by a generous social welfare system, progressive taxes, a low interest rate, monetary policy run by a nationalised Bank of England, strict capital controls, managed trade, and non-casino financial markets built the postwar state. It proved remarkably successful: GDP per head growth averaged 2.44% a year in the period from 1950 to 1973. Keynes’s economic revolution was not some utopian dream but a politically feasible project. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 18:41:49 GMT)

A photograph that is right for the website can be wrong for social media | Elisabeth Ribbans
Serious thought is given to publishing troubling images, of death or distress for example, but even then context is keyOn the morning after the Streatham terror attack, the Guardian’s print edition carried a single-column photograph of the perpetrator, Sudesh Amman, at the bottom of the front page. The main image showed armed police at the incident. Later in the day, an online reader contacted me to express concern at the prominence given to the attacker; in fact, she thought that he should not be named at all. I drew her attention to a 2019 column by my predecessor, Paul Chadwick, in which he supported the Guardian’s policy of naming perpetrators but agreed with the position of the editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, that it was important to ensure “the terrorist’s identity is not overly represented in our coverage, and that our coverage also focuses on the victims”.The reader acknowledged this but said: “I think it comes across as particularly high impact on the app, because of the formatting, and so you only see one or two stories.” Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 19:00:37 GMT)

This government threatens the heart of the BBC | Jane Martinson
We urgently need to protect the corporation from No 10’s obsession with public broadcastingOver the past seven years, there has been one director general of the BBC and eight culture secretaries. Oliver Dowden MP, who was given the job in last week’s reshuffle, can, at the very least, hope to attend one Wimbledon final before moving on from his cabinet post. But this time the new director general may not get much longer.The coming year will prove just how independent of government the BBC really is as it faces a series of huge challenges. Claire Enders tells me the conditions facing the BBC are the worst in her 35 years as a media analyst. “I wouldn’t wish the DG job on my worst enemy.” Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:17:08 GMT)

Boris Johnson is determined to break all the iron rules of politics | Larry Elliott
The PM continues to spurn convention, as the departure of Sajid Javid shows Boris Johnson has broken one of the three iron rules of politics and his defenestration of Sajid Javid shows he thinks he can break the other two as well.Rule number one is that oppositions don’t win elections; governments lose them by failing to get the economy in fine fettle as election day approaches. Administrations that preside over periods of falling living standards lose seats, as was the case with Jim Callaghan in 1979 and Theresa May in 2017. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 14:15:22 GMT)

Your DNA is a valuable asset, so why give it to ancestry websites for free? | Laura Spinney
DNA testing companies are starting to profit from selling our data on to big pharma. Perhaps they should be paying usThe announcement by 23andMe, a company that sells home DNA testing kits, that it has sold the rights to a promising new anti-inflammatory drug to a Spanish pharmaceutical company is cause for celebration. The collected health data of 23andMe’s millions of customers have potentially produced a medical advance – the first of its kind. But a few weeks later the same company announced that it was laying off workers amid a shrinking market that its CEO put down to the public’s concerns about privacy.These two developments are linked, because the most intimate data we can provide about ourselves – our genetic make-up – is already being harvested for ends we aren’t aware of and can’t always control. Some of them, such as better medicines, are desirable, but some of them should worry us. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 12:28:51 GMT)

What can we learn about Keir Starmer from his DPP days? | David Renton
A leftwing lawyer was not an obvious choice to be director of public prosecutions, as borne out by some of his decisionsI remember in July 2008 when the news broke of the decision to appoint Keir Starmer as director of public prosecutions (DPP). I was at a meeting of socialist lawyers, people who had spent their lives campaigning for the rights of homeless people and asylum seekers. We couldn’t understand why he’d taken the role.On standing for the Labour leadership, Keir Starmer published a video, setting out his record as a barrister who had represented poll tax protesters and striking miners. “I don’t think anyone,” a voiceover says, “really expected someone who dedicated his career to defending workers, trade unions and trade unions to become director of public prosecutions.” They were right about that. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 11:00:27 GMT)

Wuhan's cat rescuer: the man saving pets abandoned during coronavirus outbreak – video
It is estimated that more than 30,000 pets have been left stranded after the Chinese government sealed off Wuhan following the coronavirus outbreak. In response, people trapped in Wuhan have been volunteering and checking in on the animals whose owners are stuck outside the city. Here's Ye Jialin's story of helping those who are currently not allowed to return homeVisual explainer: how the coronavirus spread across China and the worldHow to protect yourself from coronavirus Continue reading...
(Fri, 14 Feb 2020 14:42:00 GMT)

How the Democrats will decide who fights Trump – video
More than a dozen candidates are running to take on Donald Trump in the presidential election this year. But first they must win the Democratic nomination. Lauren Gambino explains the processHow the impeachment trial is upending Democrats' race for IowaWho is running for president? The full list of 2020 candidates  Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Jan 2020 14:07:51 GMT)

Six packs, success and solitude: men in the media | Modern Masculinity
In this week's episode of Modern Masculinity, Guardian journalist Iman Amrani looks at how images of men in advertising and the media may be negatively affecting how men see themselves. While campaigns targeted at women have changed hugely in the past 20 years – with campaigns such as Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty changing the images of beauty for women – men's adverts haven't had the same transformation. Iman speaks to those in the advertising industry who are working to change the way we see men in adverts. She also takes the conversation around aspiration and success to the streets of Bolton, and puts questions to pupils at Ladybridge high schoolWatch the rest of the Modern Masculinity series here Continue reading...
(Thu, 06 Feb 2020 12:02:03 GMT)

Do face masks help prevent coronavirus? – video explainer
The Guardian's health editor, Sarah Boseley, gives the lowdown on the effectiveness of wearing face masks to protect against the coronavirus, explains how viruses are spread, and offers tips on staying healthy and safe as the outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China, continues to spreadCoronavirus: what you need to know – video explainerCoronavirus latest – live updates Continue reading...
(Wed, 05 Feb 2020 14:26:01 GMT)

Have we reached peak filler? – video explainer
The UK has been going wild for cosmetic dermal fillers in recent years. Popularised by US celebrities such as Kylie Jenner, ordinary women across the country are also getting in on the look and using dermal fillers to create artificially inflated lips, cheekbones, and jawlines. But the industry is unregulated, and without a medical professional on hand things can go badly wrong. Sirin Kale finds out how dermal fillers became so popular and asks what we need to do to make the industry safer Continue reading...
(Tue, 04 Feb 2020 12:00:53 GMT)

Why 'stronger borders' don't work
Thousands of people die annually trying to cross borders. It’s often argued stronger borders and more checks would deter people from making dangerous crossings. But how accurate is this? Maya Goodfellow explores what the current border regime means for people seeking asylum Continue reading...
(Tue, 21 Jan 2020 14:46:02 GMT)

'I had no idea hot summers could kill': how 'climate apartheid' divides Delhi – video
As the Earth continues to break new heat records, the UN is warning of a 'climate apartheid' between those who can afford to keep themselves cool and  those who must live, work, suffer – and sometimes die – in the heat. In Delhi, where a heatwave of 48C recently killed 100 people, some workers have already paid the ultimate price Continue reading...
(Wed, 22 Jan 2020 14:49:12 GMT)

Teranga – the migrant-run Afrobeat nightclub uniting Naples – video
Fata and Yankuba are two young Gambians with ambitious dreams, who fled dictatorship and poverty and landed in Naples, only to discover a new kind of violence: a pernicious climate of racism and an unhelpful immigration system. Their only escape from the psychological torture of years spent waiting for documents in squalid camps is a small underground club in the heart of the city. The Teranga nightclub provides a rare safe space for migrants to meet young Italians while dancing and singing away the collective trauma of their journeys to Europe and the discrimination they face in Italy Continue reading...
(Fri, 07 Feb 2020 12:00:07 GMT)

Families of Troubles victims warn against amnesty for soldiers
Emmett McConomy, whose 11-year-old brother died in 1982, said cases ‘not going away’A man whose 11-year-old brother was killed by a soldier in Northern Ireland nearly 40 years ago has warned that victims’ families “were not going to go away” if the British government tried to introduce an amnesty for military personnel.Emmett McConomy, whose older brother Stephen was shot in the back of the head with a plastic bullet, said the new Northern Ireland secretary, Brandon Lewis, needed to understand the strength of feeling among families who had not yet seen cases involving British soldiers come to court. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 18:26:11 GMT)

AI systems claiming to 'read' emotions pose discrimination risks
Expert says technology deployed is based on outdated science and therefore is unreliableArtificial Intelligence (AI) systems that companies claim can “read” facial expressions is based on outdated science and risks being unreliable and discriminatory, one of the world’s leading experts on the psychology of emotion has warned.Lisa Feldman Barrett, professor of psychology at Northeastern University, said that such technologies appear to disregard a growing body of evidence undermining the notion that the basic facial expressions are universal across cultures. As a result, such technologies – some of which are already being deployed in real-world settings – run the risk of being unreliable or discriminatory, she said. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:00:34 GMT)

Britons onboard cruise ship face extended coronavirus quarantine
Changes to Japanese procedure could mean two more weeks on the Diamond PrincessBritons could face two more weeks trapped onboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship as Japan updates its quarantine procedure in an effort to halt the rapid spread of coronavirus among passengers.Cruise ship guests received a letter on Sunday saying that while those who tested negative for the virus would be allowed to leave on Wednesday, anyone who shared a room with a passenger who tested positive would face another two weeks onboard, starting from the date they were separated from their cabin mate. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:19:11 GMT)

McDonnell and Starmer show split on Labour's Brexit stance
Shadow chancellor says party was caught in a ‘vice’ while Starmer insists policy was rightA sharp split has emerged between the two chief architects of Labour’s Brexit policy as John McDonnell and Keir Starmer delivered vastly different verdicts on how their strategy affected the party’s performance in December’s general election.McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, who is said to have convinced Jeremy Corbyn to back a second referendum, said in an exclusive interview before the budget that the party had been caught in a “vice” trying to please voters and members. The Tories had a simple message that was “unchallengable”, he suggested. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:56:34 GMT)

Church group criticises US plan to rein in smaller shareholders
Exclusive: investors say SEC plans will make it harder to push for better governanceManagers of the Church of England’s £8.3bn investment portfolio have criticised US regulators for planning to deny smaller shareholders, such as the church, the right to challenge US companies over excessive executive pay and the climate crisis.A group of 70 church investors, including the C of E, have written to the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) opposing its plans to “modernise” shareholder rules by adding stricter criteria for filing resolutions voted on at a company’s annual meeting. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:06:30 GMT)

Outgoing Bank of England head to face questions over audio leak
Mark Carney and successor Andrew Bailey may be called in to explain hedge funds’ early access to press audio feedBank of England governor Mark Carney faces being hauled before parliament to answer questions about a embarrassing security breach that allowed hedge funds early access to an audio feed of market-moving press conferences.Mel Stride, the Conservative MP who is chair-elect of the Treasury select committee, said he would call in Carney and his incoming successor Andrew Bailey to explain the breach, which could have allowed hedge funds to make money by buying or selling sterling depending on Carney’s sentiments on the economy. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:06:15 GMT)

Transport secretary denies he spoke to China about HS2
Grant Shapps says apart from a letter from Beijing’s railway-builder no direct talks have taken placeThe UK government has not spoken to China about helping to build the troubled HS2 high-speed railway, according to the transport secretary, Grant Shapps.Shapps dismissed reports that he spoken to Beijing’s state-owned railway-builder about a role in the construction of the rail link. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 15:13:10 GMT)

Budget may be delayed in wake of Sajid Javid's departure from No 11
Chancellor Rishi Sunak may have to choose date beyond scheduled date of 11 MarchBoris Johnson’s government might be forced to delay its first budget after the former chancellor Sajid Javid walked out last week in a row about his special advisers.The transport secretary, Grant Shapps, said Javid’s replacement, Rishi Sunak, may have to choose a new date beyond the timetabled budget due on 11 March. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 12:14:30 GMT)

Labour candidates called on to justify transphobia claims
Woman’s Place UK demands evidence for allegation on pledge card signed by some candidatesLabour leadership candidates who signed a pledge calling several organisations “trans-exclusionist hate groups” are facing demands to produce evidence for the allegation.A row over a pledge card drawn up by the Labour Campaign for Trans Rights group broke out last week after Rebecca Long-Bailey, Emily Thornberry and Lisa Nandy, as well as deputy leadership candidates Angela Rayner and Dawn Butler, all expressed support for the charter. It calls on Labour to expel “transphobic” members, and describes campaigns including Woman’s Place UK as “trans-exclusionist hate groups”. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 09:26:25 GMT)

Women's Equality party candidate pulls out of London mayoral race
Mandu Reid will replace Sue Black, who was forced to withdraw after vaginal mesh implant complicationsThe Women’s Equality party’s candidate for London mayor has been forced to pull out of the race after suffering complications from a vaginal mesh implant.The party claims Prof Sue Black has been a victim of entrenched “health inequalities” affecting thousands of women and that it will be campaigning to get the mesh permanently banned in the UK. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:35:25 GMT)

Taiwan reports first death from coronavirus
Taxi driver with diabetes and hepatitis B is fifth fatality outside mainland ChinaA taxi driver has died from the coronavirus in Taiwan, marking the first such death on the island and the fifth fatality outside mainland China from an epidemic that has curbed travel and disrupted global supply chains.The health minister, Chen Shih-chung, said during a news conference on Sunday that the deceased was a 61-year-old man who had diabetes and hepatitis B. Taiwan has to date reported 20 confirmed cases. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:09:58 GMT)

Russian artist and girlfriend held over release of Paris politician's sex video
Petr Pavlensky and partner questioned after complaint from Benjamin Griveaux The girlfriend of a Russian performance artist and activist who released a video of a sexual nature that prompted a Paris mayoral candidate to stand down is being questioned by police over her role in the scandal.The woman, named by French media as Alexandra de Taddeo, was taken into custody along with the artist, Petr Pavlensky, on Saturday afternoon as they left a Paris hotel. They are being questioned over accusations of invasion of privacy and “broadcasting images of a sexual nature without the permission of the person involved”. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:19:57 GMT)

Libya arms embargo is a joke, says UN envoy as ceasefire talks continue
Blunt assessment follows Munich meeting to try to mediate between warring sidesThe UN-backed arms embargo in Libya has become a joke and the country’s financial position is deteriorating rapidly, the UN deputy special envoy for Libya, Stephanie Williams, has said after foreign ministers met in Munich to try to enforce a ceasefire between the two warring sides.Since a meeting of world leaders in Berlin last month to draw up a Libyan peace plan, both sides in the civil war have ignored international appeals and turned back to their external sponsor nations for further arms and mercenary support. Last week the UN security council passed a resolution calling for enforcement of the arms embargo and a ceasefire. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:10:16 GMT)

German court orders Tesla to stop felling trees for Gigafactory
Ruling comes after state environmental office greenlit clearance of 92 hectares of forestA German court has ordered Tesla to stop clearing forest land near Berlin to build its first European car and battery factory, in what is being hailed as a victory for environmental activists.The US electric carmaker announced plans last November to build a “Gigafactory” in Grünheide in the eastern state of Brandenburg. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:47:00 GMT)

Families trapped by Assad’s assault on Idlib fight to survive in the snow
Vast numbers of people are caught between regime bombings and closed Turkish borderHundreds of thousands of civilians, many of them women and children, are stranded with little food or shelter in sub-zero temperatures in north-western Syria, forced from their homes by a Russian-backed military offensive that has often targeted hospitals and other civilian infrastructure.The assault on Idlib, the last stronghold of the Syrian opposition, has created one of the greatest humanitarian crises of a long and brutal war. It has displaced more than 800,000 people since December, the United Nations said, 143,000 of them in the last three days alone. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 08:57:24 GMT)

French ski resort moves snow with helicopter in order to stay open
Local council leaders said they were forced into ‘exceptional’ move to protect jobsA French ski resort has angered ecologists by using a helicopter to move snow from higher up the mountains after exceptionally mild weather left its slopes bare.Officials at Luchon-Superbagnères in the Pyrenees authorised the “exceptional” emergency operation overnight on Friday. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 14:48:28 GMT)

Pete Buttigieg 'won't take lectures' from Rush Limbaugh or any Trump supporter
Radio host doubts Americans ready for gay candidateDemocrat ‘saddened for what Republican party has become’Pete Buttigieg is “not going to be lectured on family values from the likes of Rush Limbaugh or anybody who supports Donald J Trump as the moral as well as political leader of the United States”, the Democratic presidential contender said on Sunday. Related: Biden and Sanders take aim at Bloomberg as Nevada caucuses loom Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 17:12:17 GMT)

Historic Uzbekistan theatre under threat from developers
The independent Ilkhom theatre in Tashkent opened under Soviet rule in 1976A cherished independent theatre in Uzbekistan is fighting eviction after realestate developers in the booming capital selected its historic location for a new business centre.The Ilkhom theatre of Mark Weil, which has provided a rare venue for experimental theatre and culture in Tashkent since the Soviet era, says it could be forced out of its home for up to two years because of renovations required by a new building owner, Ofelos Plaza. A prolonged disruption could prove a “death sentence” to the theatre, according to its directors, and that threat has ignited an international campaign to protect it under the social media hashtag #SaveIlkhom. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:10:21 GMT)

Israeli group plan Burning Man-like event in occupied West Bank
PLO secretary general criticises invitation for Palestinians to attend as insultingA plan by an Israeli group to hold a Burning Man-style event in the deserts of the occupied territories has sparked frustration among Palestinians and dismay from Israeli festival enthusiasts who say it goes against the original event’s founding principles.The annual gathering in the Nevada desert in the US, with its massive art installations, costumes and symbolic burning of an effigy of “The Man”, has gathered a global following. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:21:30 GMT)

Harvey Weinstein faces moment of truth as jury weighs case on Tuesday
The #MeToo movement received barely a mention at the movie mogul’s rape trial but is likely to bear heavily on deliberationsThe jury at Harvey Weinstein’s rape trial in New York will begin deliberations on Tuesday, with the world’s media and the expectations of the #MeToo movement bearing heavily upon them. Related: 'Master of his universe': Weinstein saw women as disposable, prosecutor says Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 07:00:22 GMT)

Doctor Who recap: series 38, episode eight – The Haunting of Villa Diodati
A chilling ghost story unfolds in a classic haunted house ... and the Doctor sets herself up for a cataclysmic finale. Bring on the most epic war of all! Welcome to Lake Geneva. Fair to say it’s been a few weeks of squiffy, high-concept episodes. Now, we get something more traditional – a good old-fashioned ‘celebrity historical’. The Doctor wants to take Team Tardis somewhere fun, opting for the night Lord Byron challenged a nascent Mary Shelley to write what would become Frankenstein. Everything unfolds pleasingly; there’s even dancing. Writer Maxine Alderton clearly knows her stuff, from Mary and Percy’s unconventional matrimonial arrangements to 1816 being ‘the year without a summer’. A classic ghost story unfolds in a classic haunted house, and we get the sort of history lesson that should always form part of Doctor Who’s MO. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 20:00:38 GMT)

Elton John cuts short New Zealand gig after catching pneumonia
Singer ‘deeply upset and sorry’ for cutting short farewell concert in AucklandSir Elton John has said he is “deeply upset and sorry” for cutting short a concert in New Zealand after being diagnosed with a mild form of pneumonia.The musician, 72, was performing at Auckland’s Mount Smart Stadium on Sunday when he lost his voice and broke down in tears on stage. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 16:57:52 GMT)

A deeper Splash: the artist painting the pool cleaners David Hockney forgot
As Hockney’s cool pool dive goes for £23m, we meet Ramiro Gomez, the Mexican-American putting labourers, security guards, removal men and more back into the pictureDavid Hockney’s “splash” paintings are still making waves. A medium-sized canvas from the 1967 series, showing the aftermath of a dive into the clear blue waters of a California pool, just sold at auction for £23m. In the half-century since it was painted, the work has become synonymous with a languid LA lifestyle, from the glass-fronted house beyond the pool to the two perfect palm trees reaching into a sky empty of everything but blue. This is a secluded bolthole, an oasis from the world of noise, a place to drink and dive.Yet what might the picture look like if its focus was altered, away from the entry into the pool made by that swimmer whose identity Hockney never knew (having based the picture on a photograph)? What if the attention was instead shifted towards the less fortunate guys who have to service the waters and make sure they’re clean enough for rich people to plunge into? Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 15:00:32 GMT)

Andy Warhol's 1950s erotic drawings of men to be seen for first time
Collection lined up for major publication not displayed before due to homophobia artist encounteredAll about Andy: extracts from Warhol – A Life As ArtDozens of previously unpublished Andy Warhol drawings on the theme of love, sex and desire are to be seen for the first time. The pop artist’s foundation is releasing a major study of his depictions of young men in private moments, whether in a loving embrace or more explicit acts.They date from the 1950s, when Warhol was a successful commercial illustrator but struggling to find recognition as a fine artist, long before he created paintings and prints of movie stars, soup cans and soap-pad boxes that turned him into one of the world’s most famous artists. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:12:29 GMT)

Parasite: how Oscar triumph has exposed South Korea’s social divide
Bong Joon-ho’s film highlights how South Koreans struggle as the gap between rich and poor widensFew would begrudge South Koreans their moment of joy after Parasite’s historic success at the Oscars. Not only was Bong Joon-ho’s film the first non-English language production in the Academy Awards’ 92-year history to win best picture – one of four Oscars on the night for the director and his crew – it was long-overdue recognition by the global movie industry of the brilliance of South Korean cinema.But the celebrations, led by the country’s president, Moon Jae-in, concealed an uncomfortable truth about Bong’s masterpiece. Centring on the tension between the Kims, a basement-dwelling family of “dirt spoons” in Seoul, and the Parks, a family at the opposite end of the social spectrum, Parasite’s plot is predicated on the widening gap between the haves and the have nots in Asia’s fourth-biggest economy. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 10:12:26 GMT)

James Blunt review – beige balladeer turns up the self-deprecating charm
Birmingham ArenaBlunt brings his social media wit to a Valentine’s day show in which the best moments are the most personalHaving a global smash as couple-friendly as You’re Beautiful would often cast a singer-songwriter as gooey but wearily earnest “serious artist”. But James Blunt tore up the script, using social media to reinvent himself as a troll-obliterating, self-deprecating wit. When a chap tweeted him fretting that he was “really enjoying James Blunt’s new album” (Once Upon a Mind), the 45-year-old former army captain shot back: “It’s the menopause.”This is the persona Blunt brings to concerts, which may have been a fiendish career move but seems to come naturally. He jokes that people are “weird, but lovely” to attend his gig on Valentine’s night and reveals that Elton John advised him to always play the hits. “That’s me fucked. I’d have to play You’re Beautiful 22 times.” He dedicates a song to “couples” and with comic timing introduces Goodbye My Lover, a song about a crushing breakup, performed with the intensity he wrote it. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 11:19:41 GMT)

‘I finally had control. It was my account’: starting over again in emergency accommodation
For a woman staying in refuge, sorting out a new bank account is made all the more difficult when you can’t reveal the addressI suffered domestic abuse for several years when I was with my husband. The abuse would be in the house, but in front of others he would act completely differently. I was trapped, too frightened to leave, given all that he had done to me and threatened to do. He controlled every aspect of my life, including the finances. He set up a joint account, but the Jobseeker’s Allowance came in his name and only he accessed that account. I would have to ask him for money, even for basic essentials.After many years I eventually found a way to leave him. I was supported by Birmingham and Solihull Women’s Aid, who found me emergency temporary accommodation in a refuge. Continue reading...
(Tue, 17 Dec 2019 16:33:18 GMT)

Why homeless people without ID are especially vulnerable to financial abuse
Violent crime is a daily hazard for homeless people – but document theft and financial exploitation can also pose a threatHomeless people are much more likely to be victims of violent crime than those of us lucky enough to have a roof over our heads. Indeed, a survey by the charity Crisis found that almost eight out of 10 homeless people had suffered some sort of violence, abuse or antisocial behaviour, while more than one in three had been deliberately hit, kicked, or experienced some other form of violence while sleeping rough.More than half also reported having had things stolen from them, and almost a quarter have had their belongings deliberately damaged or vandalised. Continue reading...
(Tue, 10 Dec 2019 16:52:28 GMT)

‘It’s a lifeline’ – how bank accounts can disrupt the cycle of homelessness
Bank accounts that don’t require customers to have a permanent address are helping homeless people to get back on their feet Kai, a 22-year-old man from Ilford, east London, has been staying at Centrepoint for the past four years. He became a primary carer for his father in his teens, which led to him dropping out of college. When his father died he lost his accommodation rights.“When I left college I no longer qualified for income support,” he says. “I didn’t understand the benefits system, I didn’t know how to open a bank account and my dad hadn’t been well enough to help me.” Continue reading...
(Tue, 10 Dec 2019 16:52:59 GMT)

‘Bank accounts are crucial’: the ex-rough sleeper helping Brighton’s homeless get back on their feet
Jim Deans, 60, moved to the south coast 30 years ago from Glasgow, sleeping on a beach when he had no money. Now, through his charity, he helps people who are homeless to rebuild their livesI was born on the south side of Glasgow. I was heading for a life of crime in my teens because I was in with some bad people. After a brush with the law, I headed as far south as I could go before I hit the sea. I ended up in Brighton.I didn’t have money or a job and I couldn’t get into a hostel, so I slept under an upturned boat on the beach. In the morning I’d get up, tuck my rucksack inside the boat and head off to find work. I picked up work in nightclubs. Cash was king back then – I could get work cash-in-hand and it helped set me up. After six months, I managed to save enough to put down a deposit on a bedsit and open a bank account. That route to gaining financial independence no longer exists for homeless people. You can’t get paid in cash, which means you need a bank account before you can get work. The cashless economy is another big problem for homeless people. Continue reading...
(Thu, 19 Dec 2019 17:05:26 GMT)

50 things we love in the world of food right now
Brilliant bakers, sibling chefs and the biochemist who became Britain’s best brewer: presenting Observer Food Monthly’s food favourites for 2020 Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 11:00:27 GMT)

‘I look at the clock… it’s 3am’: Why can’t women sleep?
While her husband snores peacefully beside her, Mariella Frostrup, like women everywhere, is wide awake – mind spinning. But why? And what can she do about it?It is 3am. I know because I’ve checked the clock three times since I crept to the loo at 1.45am. Within minutes of my return to bed I feel the delicious fog of slumber evaporate, my heart rate rises and my brain begins its relentless scan for topics to keep me engaged. Occasionally, I get a laugh out of what I dream up as a priority worry; more often I’m shocked by the banality. A thank you note I failed to send a year ago; the small part for a kitchen appliance I keep forgetting to order; whether I booked Ocado for Friday; whether Stormzy will agree to talk to me about his favourite books; the shirt my son needs; guilt because I didn’t call my friend with breast cancer; where to go on summer holidays; how to get the car to its service in Yeovil; why the person I discussed documentary ideas with hasn’t replied; did I book a blowdry on Tuesday? And where has that blue dress gone?I look at the clock again, it’s 3.15am and I’m getting closer to the moment when I’m going to have to medicate or resign myself to staying awake. Now adding to my copious preoccupations: what do I have to do in the morning? Can I afford to be exhausted or should I resort to the cornucopia of drugs and sleep aids crammed into my bedside drawer? While I attempt to follow the cognitive behavioural therapy advice I’ve been given and count my breaths – five in, five out – to restore my equilibrium and compartmentalise the turmoil, my husband snores deafeningly beside me. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 08:00:24 GMT)

How to check yourself for breast cancer
Every woman is different and it’s best to get into the habit of examining yourself regularly so you can spot any changesThere is no evidence to suggest that a particular technique works best, but checking your breasts regularly is vital; the sooner breast cancer is diagnosed, the more effective treatment may be.All breasts are different, so women are encouraged to get to know their own breasts over time. Follow this simple advice: touch, look and check (TLC). Some breasts have natural bumps or nodular breast tissue, and women often have one breast larger than the other. Changes can also occur to the breasts during women’s cycles. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:00:29 GMT)

Victoria Beckham starts a quiet hemline revolution at London fashion week
The designer broke with the mid-calf skirt ubiquitous in fashion with a knee-length skirtIt is six years since a new hemline made fashion headlines. But on Sunday morning at London fashion week, Victoria Beckham broke with the mid-calf length that has become ubiquitous in fashion with a radical trend: the knee-length skirt.A knee-length skirt worn with a blouse and sweater may not sound like a revolutionary look. But Beckham’s influence – as a designer and a much-photographed celebrity – having been key in making longer skirts into a mainstream trend, her volte-face may signal the beginning of a wider trend. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 15:33:07 GMT)

Fail productively… how to turn yourself into a super-learner
Whether you’re taking up the oboe or finessing your Finnish, scientific research offers tips to aid learningIf your aim for 2020 was to learn a new skill, you may be at the point of giving up. Whether you are mastering a new language or a musical instrument, or taking a career-changing course, initial enthusiasm can only take you so far, and any further progress can be disappointingly slow.From these struggles, you might assume that you simply lack a natural gift – compared to those lucky people who can learn any new skill with apparent ease. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:00:30 GMT)

The Gallivant, Camber: ‘Unfussy and extremely satisfying cooking’ – restaurant review | Jay Rayner
This East Sussex restaurant is by the sea, but the food is so good you may not make it to the beachThe Gallivant, Camber, East Sussex TN31 7RB (01797 225 057). Small plates £6-£8, mains £14-£32.50, desserts £7-£8, and wines from £24Sunshine. That’s what stays in the memory after lunch at the Gallivant, a small hotel and restaurant by Camber Sands in Rye. Lots of sunshine. It’s not simply that the sun is literally shining when the taxi drops us there, although it is – a pale, milky sunlight of the sort you find close to the sea in winter. It is the whitewashed dining room itself, with its slat-board panelling and, framed under glass, myriad swimsuits attesting to the glorious variety of the human form. There are rubber plants and blond wood floorboards. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 06:00:22 GMT)

Tell us: have you been affected by the coronavirus?
If you have been affected or have any information or news tips for our journalists, we would like to hear from you新型冠状病毒:现在武汉的情况怎么样?The number of casualties from coronavirus reached nearly 1,400, with more than 5,000 new cases reported on Friday, dampening optimism that the virus will soon be contained.Following a meeting of senior leaders in Beijing on Thursday, Larry Kudlow, the director of the National Economic Council, called on officials to be more open. “We are a little disappointed that we haven’t been invited in and we’re a little disappointed in the lack of transparency coming from the Chinese,” he said. Continue reading...
(Thu, 13 Feb 2020 08:53:54 GMT)

Tell us how you have been affected by flooding in the UK
We want to hear from people who are still recovering from the effects of flooding in their local areaWe’d like you to help us document the impact of flooding across the UK.With parts of Britain still recovering from Storm Ciara, flood warnings are to remain in place as Storm Dennis arrives on Saturday, bringing strong winds and heavy showers. Continue reading...
(Tue, 11 Feb 2020 15:03:43 GMT)

Tell us about hidden France for the chance to win £200 towards a UK/Europe stay
Share details on your visits to France, recommending places off the tourist trail. Send us a tip to win £200 towards a Sawday’s breakYou may have “discovered” an idyllic village, family-run hotel, small museum/gallery or fantastic walks off the beaten track. Maybe it was a local park or garden, characterful chateau, interesting shop, B&B or neighbourhood brasserie. Even unsung seaside towns could feature – anywhere not widely known to visitors.Please ensure your tip stays around 100 words, and provide websites (and prices if helpful) and exact locations. Continue reading...
(Tue, 11 Feb 2020 14:15:21 GMT)

Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of ‘clash’
Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘clash’The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘clash’.Share your photos of what clash means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 09:00:25 GMT)

Internet privacy: the apps that protect you from your apps
Worried about the data collected about you? A new generation of startups is making apps to put your privacy settings straightTech companies don’t have favourite songs, but if they did, they would all pick Radiohead’s Just – “You do it to yourself, you do/ And that’s what really hurts,” they would croon, staring their users dead in the eye. And strictly speaking, they’d be right: many of the worst excesses of the industry are, technically, optional. The world isn’t actually a binary choice between living in a surveillance state and opting out of all technological development since the turn of the millennium. You can opt out – you just have to know how.Of course, that knowledge is not always easily acquired, nor is it necessarily easy to apply. So a new breed of services has arrived to try to help normal users take control of their digital lives. Companies including Disconnect.Me and Jumbo act as something like a digital concierge for their users, tweaking privacy settings, deleting sensitive data and throwing a spanner into the inner workings of surveillance capitalism. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 07:00:24 GMT)

‘Fighting like ferrets in a bag’ as EU tries to plug Brexit cash hole
UK’s withdrawal has left £62bn hole in bloc’s purse for the next seven yearsPresidents, prime ministers and chancellors across Europe will pack their bags later this week in preparation for a long weekend in Brussels. They won’t, however, be taking in the baroque majesty of the Grand Place or savouring the local culinary treats. Instead, they will be preparing for that most infamous of events, a “four shirter”, to use the clothes-packing gauge adopted by male diplomats to measure the length and horror of EU leaders’ summits in the Belgian capital. The thorny subject this time around? Money. And the problem? Britain.The UK’s withdrawal from the European Union has left a huge €75bn (£62bn) hole in the bloc’s budget for the next seven years, 2021 to 2027. “And now we are fighting like ferrets in a sack,” said one EU diplomat with a sigh. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 07:44:23 GMT)

'Trump is deciding who is American': how the new travel ban is tearing families apart
As six countries are added to the list of restrictions, Nigerian and Eritreans in the US say the ban is devastating their livesIt started out as a joyous day for Olumide. On 31 January, the 32-year-old Nigerian American learned in an email that the US was finally processing the visa applications of his wife and daughter in Nigeria.Hours later, Donald Trump shattered their celebration, announcing that he was adding six countries to the travel ban, including Nigeria. The decision cuts off pathways to permanent US residency for Nigerians, throwing Olumide’s case into limbo at the final stage of the process. It leaves his wife and and 11-year-old girl stuck across an ocean with little hope of making it to the US. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 11:00:27 GMT)

Putting men in the frame: images of a new masculinity
Women have spent centuries under the male gaze. Men, less so. As a new exhibition opens at the Barbican in London, Luke Turner ponders what today’s increasingly fluid notions of masculinity mean for us allThe male gaze can be harshest when directed at the self. Until puberty, I was blissfully unaware of my own body, aside from the odd graze or bee sting. But then, at the age of 11 or 12, my body became a contested space. In the steaming showers after PE, I compared myself unfavourably to others, both my classmates and what I saw in the wider culture. I’m sure I wasn’t alone in finding that infamous Coca-Cola window-cleaner advert (in which a shirtless man tantalises an office full of women) to be 30 seconds of highly triggering humiliation – and a (low-calorie) modicum of sweet revenge for all the years of men doing the same to women.Yet watching the video again as I write this essay on how to explore the buffeted nature of modern masculinity against the physicality of the male body itself, I can easily recall that awkward, resentful twinge. For the past quarter-century or so, my life staring at men has been a complicated experience – a signal to arousal, yes, but also to fright and flight; to self-loathing at my own physical inadequacy. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 09:30:25 GMT)

Dark Towers review: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump and a must-read mystery
David Enrich delivers a master class in financial sleuthing but much about bank and billionaire remains unknownSteve Bannon, the brains behind Donald Trump’s upset election victory, saw the danger posed by the cash cravings of the First Family. In Fire and Fury, Michael Wolff chronicled Bannon drawing a direct line between purported dark doings at Deutsche Bank and Jared Kushner’s brushes with the Mueller investigation: “This is all about money laundering … It goes through Deutsche Bank and all the Kushner shit.” Related: In his assault on justice, Trump has out-Nixoned Nixon Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 06:00:21 GMT)

Power play: how the chancellor lost control of No 11
For a decade Whitehall has been left in little doubt of the special adviser’s powerAs Tory MPs gathered in parliament on Wednesday evening, just hours before a reshuffle that most believed would be intriguing rather than explosive, they gave a warm welcome to the opening speaker. A grinning Sajid Javid, whose position as chancellor had previously been publicly guaranteed by the prime minister, said a few warm words before introducing Andy Street, the West Midlands mayor who talked them through his plans. For those in the room with doubts about Javid’s future, his cameo reassured them that he would survive the imminent ministerial cull.Despite the smile, however, Javid himself had become less confident in his position in the days leading up to Thursday’s reshuffle. He confided in friends that he feared his special advisers were being targeted by Downing St. A week of damaging media briefings about the forthcoming budget and relations between the Treasury and No 10 had raised fresh doubts. Those doubts were well founded: by late morning, he had gone. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 08:22:24 GMT)

Masked dogs and fashion giants: Sunday's best photos
The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 13:49:01 GMT)

The big picture: high kicks in Sheffield
Commissioned to capture the changing face of 1980s Sheffield, John Darwell encountered two guys keen to show off their movesJust over 30 years ago, John Darwell was asked by the now defunct Untitled Gallery in Sheffield to produce a series of photographs documenting the changing face of the city. “Oh God, don’t tell me things like that,” he says, contemplating the passage of time.Born and bred in Bolton “within earshot of the factory whistle”, Darwell was already known for his work on the Manchester Ship Canal and the industrial landscape around Manchester. So he was a natural choice to explore the regeneration of Sheffield and its move away from heavy industry after the closure of its steelworks under Thatcher. Continue reading...
(Sun, 16 Feb 2020 07:00:24 GMT)

Caroline Flack – in pictures
The TV presenter hosted many of UK television’s biggest reality shows and their spinoffs Continue reading...
(Sat, 15 Feb 2020 23:35:59 GMT)

A stitch during time: artists and prisoners sew together – in pictures
Since 1997, the charity Fine Cell Work has been teaching British prisoners creative needlework. Now these stitchers, 95% of whom are men, have collaborated with eight artists, including Ai Weiwei and Cornelia Parker, to create artworks to appear in an exhibition and auction at Sotheby’s called Human Touch.Human Touch is at Sotheby’s, London W1, from 26 February to 3 March. Continue reading...
(Sat, 15 Feb 2020 17:00:06 GMT)

Spring clean: the key looks from the new collections – in pictures
Power shoulders, pastels, frills and black tie dressing, we take some of the trends from the SS20 season for a spin• Read more from the spring/summer 2020 edition of The Fashion, our biannual style supplement Continue reading...
(Sat, 15 Feb 2020 14:00:02 GMT)

Landscapes, languor and limbs: the other side of Dorothea Lange
Migrant Mother, Lange’s image from the Depression, came to define her – but a new book reveals a more intimate, strikingly modern side to the great photographer‘Some things you do get a life of their own,” Dorothea Lange once told an interviewer. “They cut loose from the person who made them.” She was referring to her photograph Migrant Mother, in which she distilled the collective trauma of the Great Depression into a single, hauntingly intimate portrait of Florence Owens Thompson, a sharecropper’s wife.Taken in 1936, it became one of the most famous images of the 20th century, but the way it came to define her work made Lange ambivalent about the role – and limits – of documentary photography. Continue reading...
(Fri, 14 Feb 2020 15:28:52 GMT)

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